Thanks to our sponsors:

View all sponsors

|
The Art Institute of Chicago in 1893 (Courtesy of The Art Institute of Chicago)

Saturday marks 125 years since the opening of the historic building that houses the Art Institute of Chicago. We reflect on the past – and look to the future – with James Rondeau, the museum’s president and director.

|
“Chicago Lights,” ShanZuo ZhouShi and DaHuang ZhouShi (Credit: Abigail Zoe Martin)

Abigail Zoe Martin moved to Chicago three years ago and used her camera as a calling card. A new exhibition of her work features portraits of both famous faces and little-known locals.

|

The first electric guitar Bob Dylan played live in performance – a legendary instrument which sparked uproar – is on public display at the American Writers Museum. We go for a look.

|
Sue the T. Rex (Courtesy The Field Museum)

Sue’s move to a new 5,100-square-foot home is part of a decadeslong plan to display the dinosaur in a proper scientific context that helps demonstrate why the T. Rex “is widely considered the greatest dinosaur fossil in the world.”

|
Field Museum conservation technicians Ellen Jordan and J. Kae Good Bear work on the care of cultural materials in the Regenstein Lab. (© Field Museum, photo by John Weinstein)

Many of the displays in the museum’s Native American Hall have gone unchanged since the 1950s. Now, Native American scholars and tribal members will work with the museum to “better represent” these stories.

|
Wall clock designed by George Stephens and made by the Hammond Clock Company, Chicago, 1938. (Chicago History Museum)

A look at Chicago’s historical influence on an enduring design style. Plus, overlooked graphic art made by African-American designers.

|
A taxidermy mount of the foot of a Cooper’s hawk at the Field Museum (Courtesy The Field Museum)

From Thursday through Sunday, volunteers who help transcribe labels from the museum’s massive collection of physical specimens get free admission for the day and a behind-the-scenes tour.

|
Interior of a Chicago saloon, 1905 (Chicago Daily News negatives collection / Chicago History Museum)

Visitors to the Field Museum this fall will have a chance to soak up Chicago’s rich beer history, with a focus on the immigrant communities that established the city’s first breweries.

|
Jim Nutt. “Wowidow,” 1968. The Art Institute of Chicago, The Lacy Armour and Samuel and Blanche Koffler Acquisition funds; the Estate of Walter Aitken. © Jim Nutt.

A new show at the Art Institute explores the work of a group of Chicago artists who made a strong impression on the art world in the 1960s.

|
A mother and daughter explore Shedd’s Sensory-Friendly App, designed for guests with autism or a sensory processing disorder, in front of the aquarium’s Caribbean Reef exhibit. (Brenna Hernandez / Shedd Aquarium)

On Oct. 16 and Nov. 14, registered guests will be able to explore all of Shedd’s exhibits in a “comfortable and accepting environment” as part of a new “Calm Waters” program.

|

As one of Chicago’s oldest and most prestigious institutions unveils a new look, it also looks back at an event that transformed the city.

|

Organizers say they are making progress on a new museum of gospel music planned for the former Pilgrim Baptist Church site in Bronzeville. 

|
(Brenna Hernandez / Shedd Aquarium)

The aquarium’s initiative to offer free admission to Illinois residents this month has a new twist that could help you avoid rush-hour traffic.

|
John Singer Sargent. “Street in Venice,” 1882. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Avalon Foundation.

Chicago museums and collectors played a critical role in the life of an American artist with an international profile. We take a look at the spectacular paintings of John Singer Sargent.

|

An appetizing new museum just opened in Chicago. We check out the collection of a curator with a craving.

|

Inside a new exhibition that looks at the art and legacy of the founding fathers of the museum.

randomness