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Antonio Berni, Mediodía (Noontime), 1976. Acrylic and collage on canvas, 78.22 x 78.34 inches (198.7 cm x 199 cm). Collection of the Blanton Museum of Art, the University of Texas at Austin. Barbara Duncan Fund, 1977.97. © José Antonio Berni.

Pop Art gets reframed in a new museum show that looks closely at the visual culture of the 1960s and ‘70s – and sheds light on an entire hemisphere of artwork that really pops.

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Tony Phillips, “The Space Between,” 1993. (Courtesy Elmhurst Art Museum)

Colorful and playful paintings hang next to erotic works and dark visions. An overlooked group of Chicago artists is getting its due – at a museum in Elmhurst.

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Pizza is on the menu at a Chicago museum dedicated to the world-famous dish. We check out the collection of a curator with a craving.

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At the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian, more than 80 pieces of Native American jewelry reveal cultural history and spiritual beliefs. How this wearable art helps preserve indigenous stories.

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On the South Side of Chicago is a relatively small but academically renowned museum whose founder James Henry Breasted helped rewrite the history of human civilization. We go for a look.

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New sensory features allow Field Museum visitors to smell the rotting-flesh stench of Sue the T. Rex’s breath. (Martin Baumgaertner / Field Museum)

New “sensory stations” allow visitors to get a more intimate experience of the museum’s iconic dinosaur – including the stench of Sue’s post-meal breath.

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Jonathan Kelly, co-founder of the Lawndale Pop-Up Spot. (WTTW News)

How some West Side residents are hoping to change the narrative of their community with a new safe space in the form of a museum.

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A Tiffany and Company window on display as part of the “Eternal Light” exhibition at the Driehaus Museum in Chicago. (Marc Vitali / WTTW News)

Louis Comfort Tiffany led an all-star team of artists and designers who could create almost anything out of glass: lamps, jewelry, mosaics and also artwork of a spiritual nature. We visit the exhibit “Eternal Light.” 

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A Mexican artist who died 100 years ago still influences popular culture. Inside the exhibit “Jose Guadalupe Posada: Legendary Printmaker of Mexico.”

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“Hamilton” creator Lin-Manuel Miranda, left, and exhibition designer David Korins speak with WTTW News at “Hamilton: The Exhibition.”

Peek inside the soon-to-close, 25,000-square-foot “Hamilton” exhibition on Northerly Island and hear from the man who brought Alexander Hamilton back to life: Lin-Manuel Miranda.

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Édouard Manet. “Jeanne (Spring),” 1881. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

For its big summer show this year, the Art Institute takes a fresh look at the early modern artist, Edouard Manet. We tour the show.

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Richard Browning of Gravity Industries demonstrates his Jet Suit as he takes off from the steps of the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. (Courtesy of MSI Chicago)

The exhibition “Wired to Wear” aims to lift the veil on clothing and accessories that can boost your health and wellness – or just express your creativity.

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Nickel, a green sea turtle rescued off the Florida Gulf Coast in 1998. (Courtesy Shedd Aquarium)

This massive Chicago aquarium was the world’s largest when it opened to the public in 1930. Today it holds 5 million gallons of water and features a dazzling array of creatures. Learn more fun facts about the Shedd.

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Paul Strand. Young Boy, Gondeville, Charente, France, 1951. Collection of Robin and Sandy Stuart. © Aperture Foundation, Inc. Paul Strand Archive.

Photography has long been used to make images of iconic works of art. Sometimes the photographs themselves become icons. A new show explores a collection of famous pictures from the 20th century.

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Photographer Brendan Hoffman speaks with WTTW News about his exhibition, “Brotherland: War in Ukraine.”

The young American photographer Brendan Hoffman tells us about his new show at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art.

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Laurie Simmons, Orange Hair/Snow/Close Up, 2014. Photo: © Laurie Simmons, courtesy of the artist and Salon 94.

From Meryl Streep to ventriloquist dummies, Laurie Simmons has had some unusual collaborators. We take a look at a career-spanning show by a photographer who populates fantastic worlds.