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(Courtesy Alex Ross)

The renowned comic book artist unmasks his methods for capturing Spider-Man, Black Panther and other Marvel superheroes in his new book “Marvelocity.”

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Jim Nutt. “Wowidow,” 1968. The Art Institute of Chicago, The Lacy Armour and Samuel and Blanche Koffler Acquisition funds; the Estate of Walter Aitken. © Jim Nutt.

A new show at the Art Institute explores the work of a group of Chicago artists who made a strong impression on the art world in the 1960s.

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William Walker, “Childhood Is without Prejudice,” 1977 (Photograph by James Prigoff and Robin J. Dunitz)

Chicago has been the creative home to many unusual artists over its history. A new book looks at the big picture, from the Great Chicago Fire to the art scene of today.

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How South Side artists charted new courses for Chicago art – and created a cultural legacy that echoes to this day.

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After the erroneous removal of two neighborhood murals, City Council is considering a proposal to protect and formally register Chicago’s public art.

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(Courtesy Spertus Institute)

Industry in Chicago and old world traditions in a rare show by a 20th century Chicago artist at Spertus Institute. We go for a look.

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(Courtesy of Jeong Im Herbert)

The Chicago-based artist has an uncanny ability to capture the texture of surfaces in a way that is as precise as a photograph, yet at the same time, magically abstract. 

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Inside a new exhibition that looks at the art and legacy of the founding fathers of the museum.

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Charles White. “Trenton Six,” 1949. Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, TX. (© The Charles White Archives Inc.)

On the 100th anniversary of his birth, Charles White is being recognized with the first major retrospective of his work since 1982. 

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Mosaic work on display at the Chicago Mosaic School. (Eddie Arruza / Chicago Tonight)

One of the oldest forms of art is still practiced throughout the world, but there is only one school in the United States where it’s taught. We go for a visit.

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Pauline Simon (American, 1898-1976), “Untitled (woman with book),” 1968. Collection of Karl Wirsum and Lorri Gunn.

We visit the local gallery and museum that preserves and promotes unusual art made by unusual people.

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(Credit: Sebastián Hidalgo)

Meet a photographer who captures a “culture under threat” in an area named last month by Forbes magazine as one of the 12 coolest neighborhoods in the world. 

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Charles White. “Trenton Six,” 1949. Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, TX. (© The Charles White Archives Inc.)

On the 100th anniversary of his birth, Charles White is being recognized with the first major retrospective of his work since 1982. 

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Harold Noecker. “The Genius?” c. 1943. (Collection of Bernard Friedman, Chicago)

An unusual new art show looks at fantastic and strange paintings made by Chicago and Midwestern artists in the mid-20th century. We visit the Arts Club of Chicago.

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(Courtesy of F*cking Forty)

Chicago comic artist Ed Siemienkowicz died before he could complete his 246-page graphic novel. More than 130 artists donated their time and skills to bring his story to life. 

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Ivan Albright. “Portrait of Mary Block,” 1955-‘57. Gift of Mary and Leigh Block. (© The Art Institute of Chicago)

By all accounts, Ivan Albright was a lighthearted fellow – but in the mid-20th century, the Chicago artist painted some very dark pictures.

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