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When there’s a jazz band on stage, there’s often an artist in the crowd. We visit a Chicagoan who obsessively draws the area’s jazz scene.

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Pat Lohenry

Pat Lohenry has loved miniatures for as long as she can remember. And as a teenager, she went from playing with them to making them. Today, her basement is full of her creations.

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We hit the streets to check out some 3D art that might catch you by surprise if you don’t watch where you’re going.

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(Scott Stantis / Chicago Tribune)

After a decade commenting on news for the Chicago Tribune, editorial cartoonist Scott Stantis is stepping back from the daily grind. He joins us.

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Artist Anna Dominguez, the self-described “Queen of Tape,” stands before a portrait of tennis player Serena Williams. She made the work of art using thousands of pieces of tape. (Evan Garcia / WTTW News)

When most people see a roll of duct tape, they probably see a drab, everyday object that’s occasionally useful for fixing stuff. Anna Dominguez is different.

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Susan Te Kahurangi King (New Zealand, b. 1951). Untitled, c. 2015. (Private collection, courtesy of the artist, Chris Byrne, Andrew Edlin Gallery, and Marlborough Contemporary, London and New York)

This pair of art shows couldn’t be more different, highlighting a New Zealand artist who hasn’t spoken in more than 50 years; and two Chicago artists who fight addiction with creativity.

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Neon artist Audra Jacot lights up one of her works at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s Light Lab.

Have you ever wanted to make your own neon sign? You may soon be in luck. Neon artists, led by a 30-year veteran of the School of the Art Institute, plan to offer art classes and studio space on the North Side.

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“Rushmore” by Kerry James Marshall (WTTW News)

The difference between graffiti and public art is generally in the eye of the beholder – and for some, they are one in the same. But discerning between the two will get a little easier for city crews in Chicago.

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A story from the Wrigley Field bleachers, where one fan’s love for a beer vendor turned her into a baseball artist. 

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(Photograph © Michael G. Bush)

For more than 40 years, an employee of the Cook County clerk’s office has been moonlighting as a rock ‘n’ roll photographer. Now, he’s presenting his first-ever solo exhibition.

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Seven teams of designers, artists and architects created new visions of space in the world. We visit the forward-thinking show that recently arrived from Venice, Italy.

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(Courtesy Neil Shapiro)

We learn the ABCs of jazz with Chicago author and illustrator Neil Shapiro, whose new book is a “work of love” – and an ode to the greats.

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The Innovation Studio provides a creative space to inspire young inventors about future possibilities and opportunities in science, technology, engineering, art and medicine. (J.B. Spector / Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago)

For the 49th consecutive year, the Museum of Science of Industry hosts its Black Creativity program, a celebration of achievements by African-American artists and innovators. 

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John Koch (Jay Shefsky / Chicago Tonight)

He’s been making hats and gloves for 45 years, but they’re not designed to keep us warm. Meet the man behind some eye-catching creations.

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Dawoud Bey. “Untitled #1 (Picket Fence and Farmhouse),” from the series “Night Coming Tenderly, Black,” 2017. Rennie Collection, Vancouver. © Dawoud Bey.

In a 1967 speech, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said the Underground Railroad “symbolized hope when freedom was almost an impossible dream.” Chicago photographer Dawoud Bey talks about his new exhibition, “Night Coming Tenderly, Black.” 

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Chicago artist Edo

From clothing to digital art to painting, Chicago artist Edo sees color in all forms. “Color is my thing,” he says. “I want it to light up a room.”

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