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Pictured is page 98 of “F*cking Forty” by Michael Knapp. (Courtesy of F*cking Forty)

Chicago comic artist Ed Siemienkowicz died before he could complete his nearly 250-page graphic novel. For the last two years, more than 150 artists and friends have donated their time and skills to finish what he started.

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Since the early 1980s, some of the most prominent art in the city has come from the studio of David Lee Csicsko. We caught up with him on the eve of an exhibition at an unusual location.

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Chicago artist Hebru Brantley speaks with “Chicago Tonight.” (WTTW News)

Chicago artist Hebru Brantley has created works for some of Hollywood’s biggest names, and now he’s bringing some of that work home. We explore his new exhibit, Nevermore Park.

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For years, vintage toys have inspired renowned Chicago artist Karl Wirsum. And recently he shared his fun-filled collection with an extraordinary group of local artists at Project Onward.

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Photos of work by Chicago artist George Klauba. (Marc Vitali / WTTW News)

George Klauba is back on the scene, but he no longer inks people. These days, he’s an acclaimed painter sought after by collectors locally and abroad. And his new series of paintings features tattoo art.

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Tony Phillips, “The Space Between,” 1993. (Courtesy Elmhurst Art Museum)

Colorful and playful paintings hang next to erotic works and dark visions. An overlooked group of Chicago artists is getting its due – at a museum in Elmhurst.

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Pat Lohenry

Pat Lohenry has loved miniatures for as long as she can remember. And as a teenager, she went from playing with them to making them. Today, her basement is full of her creations.

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When there’s a jazz band on stage, there’s often an artist in the crowd. We visit a Chicagoan who obsessively draws the area’s jazz scene.

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An interpretation of Chicago’s founders has been floating across the city in an effort to connect communities from Austin to Englewood. We explore the Floating Museum’s Cultural Transit Assembly.

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In a photograph titled “West Bull Nose,” Brad Temkin depicts one of the exits of Chicago’s Deep Tunnel. (Brad Temkin / The Field Museum)

Chicago photographer Brad Temkin offers a rare look at the hidden network of tunnels and infrastructure designed to deliver water, including Chicago’s 109-mile Deep Tunnel.

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(Bridgeport Art Center / Arceo Press)

For decades, the southern border of the U.S. has been a flash point for conflicting points of view. Now, artists from both sides of the border – including Chicago – are navigating the rocky road of migration in “The Border Crossed Us.”

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We hit the streets to check out some 3D art that might catch you by surprise if you don’t watch where you’re going.

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(Scott Stantis / Chicago Tribune)

After a decade commenting on news for the Chicago Tribune, editorial cartoonist Scott Stantis is stepping back from the daily grind. He joins us.

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Artist Anna Dominguez, the self-described “Queen of Tape,” stands before a portrait of tennis player Serena Williams. She made the work of art using thousands of pieces of tape. (Evan Garcia / WTTW News)

When most people see a roll of duct tape, they probably see a drab, everyday object that’s occasionally useful for fixing stuff. Anna Dominguez is different.

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Susan Te Kahurangi King (New Zealand, b. 1951). Untitled, c. 2015. (Private collection, courtesy of the artist, Chris Byrne, Andrew Edlin Gallery, and Marlborough Contemporary, London and New York)

This pair of art shows couldn’t be more different, highlighting a New Zealand artist who hasn’t spoken in more than 50 years; and two Chicago artists who fight addiction with creativity.

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Neon artist Audra Jacot lights up one of her works at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s Light Lab.

Have you ever wanted to make your own neon sign? You may soon be in luck. Neon artists, led by a 30-year veteran of the School of the Art Institute, plan to offer art classes and studio space on the North Side.

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