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Fort Collins, Colorado residents Bob Houser (from left) and Bob Falkenberg are cycling across the country with Washington, D.C. resident Annie Lipsitz to raise funds for Be the Match, a nonprofit that helps patients who need bone marrow or umbilical cord transplants. (Bob Houser / Facebook)

A trio of cyclists who have been touched by leukemia are traveling across the country to raise money and awareness for Be the Match, a nonprofit that helps patients who need bone marrow or umbilical cord blood transplants. 

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This March 26, 2018 photo provided by Ashley Atwater shows her mother, Sally Atwater, outside her home in the Georgetown area of Washington, a few days after leaving the hospital. (Courtesy Ashley Atwater via AP)

Thousands of gravely ill cancer patients each year seek “compassionate use” access to treatments that are not yet on the market but have shown some promise in early testing and aren’t available to them through a study.

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In this Tuesday, April 28, 2015 file photo, a patient has her blood drawn at a hospital in Philadelphia to monitor her cancer treatment. Companies are trying to develop blood tests that can look for signs of many types of cancer at once. (AP Photo / Jacqueline Larma, File)

Many companies are trying to develop early detection “liquid biopsy” tests that capture bits of DNA that cancer cells shed into blood.

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(valelopardo / Pixabay)

Artificial intelligence outperformed radiologists in identifying lung cancer as part of first-time screenings, according to a new study. The technology also produced fewer false positives and negatives.

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(Ian Freimuth / Flickr)

The three-year funding award will be used to develop population-specific cancer prevention and screening programs at community hospitals and health centers in Austin, Humboldt Park and South Shore.

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Diagnostic radiologist Maj. Sara Michael reviews a mammogram at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital to look for any abnormalities in the breast tissue. (Photo Credit: Maria Yager)

A new rule would require that mammography providers notify women who have dense breast tissue, a risk factor for breast cancer.

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(valelopardo / Pixabay)

Navigating cancer treatment can be overwhelming. A new pilot seeks to improve the process for patients by consolidating all aspects of treatment into one all-encompassing care plan.

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(skeeze / Pixabay)

A pair of Illinois Institute of Technology researchers developing technology to detect early stage tumors have won the university’s Nayar Prize, which includes a $500,000 award.

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Michael Polsky and Dr. Edward Schaeffer of Northwestern (Courtesy of Northwestern Medicine)

A donation from the Polsky family will fund the creation of a new multidisciplinary institute dedicated to urologic cancers, including prostate, bladder and kidney cancers.

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(Kristen Thometz / Chicago Tonight)

The donation from Chicago philanthropists Robert and Emily King will increase clinical trials at the hospital and create a fund for nursing education. 

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(snicky2290 / Pixabay)

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is revising its recommendations on cervical cancer screenings for some women. A local doctor talks about what that means for patients.

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Diagnostic radiologist Maj. Sara Michael reviews a mammogram at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital to look for any abnormalities in the breast tissue. (Photo Credit: Maria Yager)

A new state law will require mammogram providers to notify women whose test results show they have dense breast tissue, a risk factor for breast cancer. 

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Meet a Loyola University Chicago oncologist who co-authored a new study on breast cancer and chemotherapy – and a patient already benefiting from its findings.

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Karen Lewis appears on Chicago Tonight on Sept. 5, 2017.

Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis reportedly told friends “the cancer is back” before undergoing surgery Wednesday.

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(Ian Freimuth / Flickr)

Many studies on breast cancer have shown racial disparities in diagnosis and survival rates. New research suggests characteristics of a woman’s neighborhood could be contributing to those disparities.

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(valelopardo / Pixabay)

A disturbing upward trend in incidents of colorectal cancer brings about new guidelines for screenings.