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A beef-processing plant (istanbulimage / iStock)

A pork-processing plant in western Illinois released an average of nearly 2,000 pounds of harmful nitrogen per day into a tributary of the Illinois River last year, according to a new report.

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Environmental activists pose for a photo during Wednesday’s protest in downtown Chicago. (Courtesy Mighty Earth)

According to a new report, McDonald’s and Whole Foods sell meat from agribusiness companies that are responsible for mass deforestation and pollution.

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(kat_geb / Flickr)

A new law allows Illinois farmers to grow cannabis for non-drug uses, making Illinois the latest state to legalize a crop that experts say is growing in demand.

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(Linda from Chicago / Creative Commons)

Gov. Bruce Rauner on Monday vetoed a bill that advocates say would have boosted urban agriculture efforts in Chicago and other cities across the state.

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(Pexels / Pixabay)

Despite the growing number of farmers markets in Illinois and across the U.S., a number of reports in recent years show that sales across the country are down. How markets are adapting to reach today’s consumers.

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A graphic rendering of the soon-to-be completed Farm on Ogden, which opens June 22. (Courtesy Chicago Botanic Garden)

A new 20,000-square-foot urban agriculture facility aims to expand job training programs and healthy food options in one of Chicago’s most troubled neighborhoods. 

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(Linda from Chicago / Creative Commons)

Legislation that could help break up food deserts in Chicago and other cities across the state passed the Illinois Senate last week and now awaits the signature of Gov. Bruce Rauner.

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(kat_geb / Flickr)

The state is one step closer to legalizing the production of industrial hemp after a 106-3 vote in the Illinois House this week. 

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Illinois farmers are hoping for progress in Washington, where the U.S. and China have begun a second round of trade talks.

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(kat_geb / Flickr)

Agriculture advocates say industrial hemp would offer Illinois farmers an additional crop – one with a lucrative future.

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(Linda from Chicago / Creative Commons)

A bill aimed at breaking up food deserts in Chicago and other cities across the state by establishing “urban agriculture zones” moved forward last week in Springfield.

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(Pixabay)

How feasible is raising livestock in the city? An urban agriculture advocate weighs in.

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(Courtesy of Imperfect)

Roughly 20 percent of the produce grown in this country is never eaten, and a lot of it never even makes it off the farm because it doesn’t look right. Now, Chicagoans can buy that perfectly good but unattractive produce.  

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They appear to be marbled, speckled, dipped and dyed, with names like “Red Glitter” and “Jingle Bell Rock.” We visit a poinsettia farm and learn what it takes to cultivate the crop in time for the holidays.

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(Courtesy of Imperfect)

Fruits and vegetables come in all shapes and sizes, but only those that meet strict cosmetic requirements end up in grocery stores, while “ugly” produce goes to waste. Imperfect, a new produce delivery service, hopes to change that.

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(Linda N. / Flickr)

Chicago could become the first U.S. city outside of California to adopt a policy requiring it to purchase food from sources that meet a set of health, environmental and fair labor standards.

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