Stories by Associated Press

Takeaways from Day 1 of House Public Impeachment Hearings

Top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine William Taylor, and career Foreign Service officer George Kent, left, walk back from a break as they testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, during the first public impeachment hearing of President Donald Trump’s efforts to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

Wednesday’s start of public impeachment hearings in Congress marked the first time that the American public could watch and listen to the witnesses whose testimony is at the core of the Democrats’ investigation.

Justice Department Rolls Out New Program to Combat Gun Violence

In this July 8, 2019, file photo, U.S. Attorney General William Barr speaks during a tour of a federal prison in Edgefield, S.C. (AP Photo / John Bazemore, File)

Attorney General William Barr announced a new initiative Wednesday that would better enforce the U.S. gun background check system, coordinate state and federal gun cases and ensure prosecutors quickly update databases to show when a defendant can’t possess a firearm because of mental health issues.

Privacy, Consumer Groups Seek to Block Google-Fitbit Deal

In this Aug. 16, 2018, file photo, the new Fitbit Charge 3 fitness trackers with sport bands are displayed in New York. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

Nine privacy, social justice and consumer groups are calling for the U.S. government to block Google’s $2.1 billion acquisition of fitness-gadget maker Fitbit, citing antitrust and privacy concerns.

Impeachment Hearings Go Live on TV With the 1st Witnesses

The Capitol is seen as the House is set to begin public impeachment inquiry hearings as lawmakers debate whether to remove President Donald Trump from office, in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. At left is the Peace Monument. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

When the gavel strikes at the start of the House hearing on Wednesday morning, America and the rest of the world will have the chance to see and hear for themselves for the first time about President Donald Trump’s actions toward Ukraine and consider whether they are, in fact, impeachable offenses. Watch live.

Northwestern Paper’s Apology Sparks Journalism Debate

(beautifulcataya / Flickr)

Student editors at the newspaper covering Northwestern University have faced two waves of criticism over their coverage of protests in response to an event featuring former Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Then and Now: How Trump Impeachment Hearing is Different

 In this Nov. 19, 1998 file photo, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Illinois, presides over the committee’s impeachment hearing for President Bill Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Joe Marquette, File)

Even if the two most recent impeachment proceedings – against Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton – offer instructive clues about the path ahead, there are notable differences in the case surrounding Donald Trump. A look at then and now.

Chicago Rapper Lil Reese Shot, in Critical Condition

(Tony Webster / Wikimedia Commons)

Hospital officials say Tavares Taylor, who’s known as Lil Reese, is in critical condition after being shot at a suburban Chicago intersection Monday afternoon.

McDonald’s Workers Say Anti-Harassment Efforts Fall Short

In this June 25, 2019 file photo a sign is displayed outside a McDonald's restaurant in Pittsburgh. McDonald's got tough on its former CEO, who was fired last week for having a consensual relationship with an employee. Now, some workers say, the company needs to get tougher on sexual harassment in its restaurants. On Tuesday, Nov. 12 former McDonald's employee Jenna Ries filed a class-action lawsuit against the company and one of its Michigan franchisees. Ries says she and female colleagues were subjected t

At least 50 workers have filed sexual harassment charges against the company with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or in state courts over the past three years.

Trump to Release April Call with Ukraine Leader This Week

President Donald Trump speaks before the New York City Veterans Day Parade at Madison Square Park in New York, Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

Trump’s promise to release an account of his first conversation with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy comes a day before House impeachment investigators begin public hearings.

Winter Already? Snow, Deep Freeze from Rockies to East Coast

A woman clears off a Divvy bike as a winter weather advisory is issued for the Chicago area on Monday, Nov. 11, 2019, in Chicago. (Rich Hein / Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

An arctic air mass that brought snow and ice to an area stretching from the Rocky Mountains to northern New England on Monday was poised to give way to record-breaking cold temperatures.

Lobbying by Sitting Illinois Lawmakers Under Scrutiny

In this April 16, 2013 file photo, Illinois Rep. Luis Arroyo, D-Chicago, speaks on the House floor during session in Springfield, Illinois. (AP Photo / Seth Perlman)

A federal bribery charge against an Illinois state legislator has led to questions about whether lawmakers should be allowed to lobby other units of government.

FBI: Cybercrimes on the Rise Because of Sophisticated Scams

In this Friday, Nov. 8, 2019, photo, FBI Assistant Special Agent in Charge George Chamberlin, from left, speaks as Gabriel Gundersen, an FBI supervisory special agent with the Oregon Cyber Task Force, center, and Loren Cannon, FBI special agent in charge of the Portland Division, in Portland, Oregon to reporters about the rise of cybercrime in Oregon. (AP Photo / Andrew Selsky)

In 2015, $220 million was lost to wire fraud in the United States. In 2019, losses will surpass $1.5 billion, according to WFG National Title Insurance Company.

Trump Impeachment Inquiry Heads to Live TV Coverage

In this Aug. 3, 1973, file photo, the Senate Watergate Committee hearings continue on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / File)

When the House impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump begins its public phase on Wednesday, people will be watching on screens large and small. 

Like January in November: Much of US Braces for Record Lows

Reflections of a snowy city are seen in the 110-ton stainless steel Anish Kapoor sculpture called “Cloud Gate” at Millennium Park in Chicago, Sunday, Jan. 27, 2019. (AP Photo / Nam Y. Huh)

Air from Siberia — yes, Siberia — is heading toward a huge chunk of the United States and it could set record-low temperatures from Texas to New England.

Trump Launches Black Outreach Effort for 2020

President Donald Trump arrives to speak at the launch of “Black Voices for Trump” at the Georgia World Congress Center, Friday, Nov. 8, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

During the 2016 campaign, candidate Donald Trump stood in front of largely white crowds and asked black voters to consider, “What the hell do you have to lose?” Trump offered that same message Friday as he launched a black voters coalition in Atlanta, Georgia. 

US Officials Identify ‘Strong Culprit’ in Vaping Illnesses

This Monday, Nov. 4, 2019 photo shows a vitamin E acetate sample during a tour of the Medical Marijuana Laboratory of Organic and Analytical Chemistry at the Wadsworth Center in Albany, N.Y. (AP Photo / Hans Pennink)

U.S. health officials announced a breakthrough Friday into the cause of a mysterious outbreak of vaping illnesses, reporting they have a “very strong culprit.”

Facebook is Deleting the Name of Potential Whistleblower

This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook moniker on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

Facebook says it is deleting the name of the person who has been identified in conservative circles as the whistleblower who triggered a congressional impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump’s actions.

Facing Lawsuit, Devos Erases Student Loans for 1,500

In this June 5, 2018, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies during a Senate Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations in Washington. (AP Photo / Carolyn Kaster, File)

Facing a federal lawsuit and mounting criticism, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Friday said she will forgive certain student loans for more than 1,500 borrowers who attended a pair of for-profit colleges that shut down last year, including the Illinois Institute of Art.

People Puzzled By Peculiar Texts, and No One Can Say Why

In this Oct. 24, 2013, file photo, a person checks their smartphone in Glenview, Ill. A mysterious wave of texts swept America’s phones overnight Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019, delivering unintelligible messages that left many people mildly confused when they woke up on Thursday. (AP Photo / Nam Y. Huh, File)

If you woke up Thursday to a weird text that seemed totally out of place, you aren’t alone. A mysterious wave of missives swept America’s phones overnight, delivering largely unintelligible messages from friends, family and the occasional ex.

More Than 2,000 in US Diagnosed in Vaping Illness Outbreak

In this Friday, Oct. 4, 2019 file photo, a woman using a vaping device exhales a puff of smoke in Mayfield Heights, Ohio. (AP Photo / Tony Dejak, File)

New government figures show more than 2,000 people have been diagnosed with vaping illnesses in the still-unsolved U.S. outbreak.

Judge Strikes Down New Trump Rule on Religious Objections

In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019 file photo, August Mulvihill, of Norwalk, Iowa, center, holds a sign depicting a wire clothes hanger during a rally at the Statehouse in Des Moines, Iowa, to protest recent abortion bans. (AP Photo / Charlie Neibergall)

A federal judge on Wednesday struck down a new Trump administration rule that could open the way for more health care workers to refuse to participate in abortions or other procedures on moral or religious grounds.

House Dems Announce Public Impeachment Hearings Next Week

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, arrives at a closed door meeting on the ongoing House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

House Democrats will launch a major new phase of their impeachment inquiry next week with public hearings that will feature three State Department officials who have testified about their concerns about President Donald Trump’s dealings with Ukraine.

US Teen Vaping Numbers Climb, Fueled by Juul and Mint Flavor

This April 16, 2019, file photo, shows a Juul vape pen in Vancouver, Washington. (AP Photo / Craig Mitchelldyer, File)

New research shows U.S. teens who use electronic cigarettes prefer those made by Juul Labs, and mint is the favorite flavor for many of them, suggesting a shift after the company stopped selling fruit and dessert flavors in stores.

Impeachment Reversal: Diplomat Now Acknowledges Quid Pro Quo

In this Oct. 17, 2019, file photo U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland, center, arrives for a interview with the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, and House Committee on Oversight and Reform on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

In a striking reversal, a top diplomat revised his testimony in the House impeachment inquiry to acknowledge that U.S. military aid to Ukraine was being withheld until the foreign ally promised to investigate corruption as President Donald Trump wanted.

‘I Was Appalled’: Black Customers Say Host Told Them to Move

Justin Vahl of Montgomery, Illinois and his wife, Mary, right, speak during a press conference Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019 about how he was asked to move at a Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant in Naperville because a nearby couple didn't want to sit near blacks. (Paul Valade / Daily Herald via AP)

An attorney representing a group of black customers who say they were asked to change tables at a Chicago-area Buffalo Wild Wings because of their skin color urged the restaurant chain Tuesday to make wholesale changes to avoid a discrimination lawsuit.

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