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A still image from a Sprout Social video campaign. (Sprout Social YouTube)

The Chicago-based maker of social media management software announced Monday that it aims to raise $156 million in an initial public offering of stock.

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(Free-Photos / Pixabay)

Twitter says its new ban on political ads will cover appeals for votes, solicitations for campaign contributions and any political content. However, it is allowing ads related to social causes such as climate change, gun control and abortion.

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 In this Nov. 19, 1998 file photo, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Illinois, presides over the committee’s impeachment hearing for President Bill Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Joe Marquette, File)

Even if the two most recent impeachment proceedings – against Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton – offer instructive clues about the path ahead, there are notable differences in the case surrounding Donald Trump. A look at then and now.

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(JESHOOTS-com / Pixabay)

Whether it’s used comically or in connection with serious topics, a new internet meme may be underscoring deeper generational divides. 

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In this Aug. 3, 1973, file photo, the Senate Watergate Committee hearings continue on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / File)

When the House impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump begins its public phase on Wednesday, people will be watching on screens large and small. 

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks about “News Tab” at the Paley Center, Friday, Oct. 25, 2019 in New York.  (AP Photo / Mark Lennihan)

The “News Tab,” a new section in the Facebook mobile app, will display headlines — and nothing else — from the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, BuzzFeed News, Business Insider and the Los Angeles Times, among others.

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(StartupStockPhotos / Pixabay)

Should social media companies be responsible for fact-checking content? The debate over free speech on Facebook.

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This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook moniker on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

Facebook says it is ending its practice of using face recognition software to identify users’ friends in uploaded photos and automatically suggesting they “tag” them. Facebook was sued in Illinois over the feature.

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This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook moniker on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

The changes include a tightened verification process that will require anyone wanting to run ads pertaining to elections, politics or big social issues like guns and immigration to confirm their identity and prove they are in the U.S. 

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In this July 30, 2019, file photo, the social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple’s App Store. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky)

The company did not give a timeline for when it might expand it to the U.S. and other countries, only that it will be in “coming months.”

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(Pexels / Pixabay)

Why some Illinois Facebook users are suing the company over its facial recognition software for photos.

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Amateur botanist Joey Santore examines the flowering plant dalea purpurea, commonly known as the purple prairie clover. (Evan Garcia / WTTW News)

Joey Santore isn’t your typical plant expert, but his colorful style and depth of knowledge have proved popular. We go for a stroll through Wolf Road Prairie, an 80-acre nature preserve in Chicago’s western suburbs.

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(terimakasih0 / Pixabay)

Could you imagine life without the “like” button? Ben Grosser, an arts and design professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, tells us about “demetrication.”

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A still image from a video shows multiple girls attacking a 15-year-old girl in a South Side alley. (Twitter)

The teens were taken into custody and charged with felony counts of aggravated battery and mob action, days after a cellphone video of the incident was uploaded online.

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In this May 1, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote speech at F8, Facebook's developer conference, in San Jose, California. (AP Photo / Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

The fine is the largest the Federal Trade Commission has levied on a tech company, though it won’t make much of a dent for a company that had nearly $56 billion in revenue last year.

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A photo of “Chicago Tonight” host Phil Ponce, center, is edited by FaceApp to illustrate younger and older versions of him.

As the popularity of a photo-transforming app has skyrocketed, so has new concern over privacy. Derek Eder of Chicago-based company DataMade weighs in.