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Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly answers questions from reporters about the coronavirus pandemic after a meeting with legislative leaders, Thursday, July 2, 2020, at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kan. (AP Photo / John Hanna)

A weekly Kansas newspaper posted a cartoon on its Facebook page likening the Democratic governor’s order requiring people to wear masks in public to the roundup and murder of millions of Jews during the Holocaust.

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In this June 19, 2020, file photo, protesters wear protective masks as they march after a Juneteenth rally outside the Brooklyn Museum, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo / John Minchillo)

A loose network of Facebook groups that took root across the country in April to organize protests over coronavirus stay-at-home orders has become a hub of misinformation and conspiracies theories that have pivoted to a variety of new targets.

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President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn after arriving on Marine One at the White House, Thursday, June 25, 2020, in Washington. Trump is returning from Wisconsin. (AP Photo / Alex Brandon)

President Donald Trump on Sunday tweeted approvingly of a video showing one of his supporters chanting “white power,” a racist slogan associated with white supremacists. He later deleted the tweet.

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A solidarity march in Little Village on Wednesday, June 3, 2020. (WTTW News)

There was a message of unity Wednesday as solidarity marches replaced fears of racially motivated violence. We visited Pilsen, Little Village and the suburb of Cicero for a view from the ground.

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A screenshot taken from a Facebook Live video shows a crowded house party that appears to have been held in Chicago on Saturday, April 25, 2020.

Dozens of young adults flouted social distancing guidelines Saturday night at a house party that appears to have been held in Chicago. Mayor Lori Lightfoot called it “reckless and utterly unacceptable.”

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Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot takes a humorous approach to a serious subject: “Stay home, save lives.” (Chicago Mayor’s Office)

Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s tough love in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic has spawned a million memes. Now the mayor gets in on the joke with her own video.

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This Jan. 17, 2017, file photo shows a Facebook logo at Station F in Paris. Facebook has decided not to limit how political ads can be targeted to specific groups of people, as its main digital-ad rival Google did in November 2019 to fight misinformation. (AP Photo / Thibault Camus, File)

Despite escalating pressure ahead of the 2020 presidential election, Facebook reaffirmed its freewheeling policy on political ads Thursday, saying it won’t ban them, won’t fact-check them and won’t limit how they can be targeted to specific groups of people.

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A still image from a Sprout Social video campaign. (Sprout Social YouTube)

The Chicago-based maker of social media management software announced Monday that it aims to raise $156 million in an initial public offering of stock.

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(Free-Photos / Pixabay)

Twitter says its new ban on political ads will cover appeals for votes, solicitations for campaign contributions and any political content. However, it is allowing ads related to social causes such as climate change, gun control and abortion.

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 In this Nov. 19, 1998 file photo, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Illinois, presides over the committee’s impeachment hearing for President Bill Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Joe Marquette, File)

Even if the two most recent impeachment proceedings – against Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton – offer instructive clues about the path ahead, there are notable differences in the case surrounding Donald Trump. A look at then and now.

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(JESHOOTS-com / Pixabay)

Whether it’s used comically or in connection with serious topics, a new internet meme may be underscoring deeper generational divides. 

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In this Aug. 3, 1973, file photo, the Senate Watergate Committee hearings continue on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / File)

When the House impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump begins its public phase on Wednesday, people will be watching on screens large and small. 

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks about “News Tab” at the Paley Center, Friday, Oct. 25, 2019 in New York.  (AP Photo / Mark Lennihan)

The “News Tab,” a new section in the Facebook mobile app, will display headlines — and nothing else — from the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, BuzzFeed News, Business Insider and the Los Angeles Times, among others.

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(StartupStockPhotos / Pixabay)

Should social media companies be responsible for fact-checking content? The debate over free speech on Facebook.

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This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook moniker on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

Facebook says it is ending its practice of using face recognition software to identify users’ friends in uploaded photos and automatically suggesting they “tag” them. Facebook was sued in Illinois over the feature.

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This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook moniker on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

The changes include a tightened verification process that will require anyone wanting to run ads pertaining to elections, politics or big social issues like guns and immigration to confirm their identity and prove they are in the U.S. 

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