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Pritzker gets heated over Madigan aide. Hurt feelings between the mayor and City Council over LGBTQ language. Preckwinkle’s Cook County Health power play. And a new national newscast out of Chicago.

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Just weeks into 2020, fresh headlines are shining light on politicians behaving unethically. Our politics team digs into those stories and more in our weekly roundtable.

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A shocking email has Springfield at attention and Madigan on the defensive. Presidential hopefuls set up shop in Illinois. Cannabis flies off the shelves in Chicago and a local coyote gets a DNA test.

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(Adam Jones / Flickr)

House Speaker Michael Madigan rebuffed a call by his Republican counterpart to convene a special House committee to investigate an alleged “criminal cover-up” detailed in an email written by one of Madigan’s top confidants.

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The fallout from an explosive story involving a top ally of House Speaker Michael Madigan. Our politics team digs into that story and more in our weekly roundtable.

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Jacob Meister, a Democratic candidate for Cook County circuit court clerk, speaks to reporters on Monday, Nov. 25, 2019. (WTTW News)

Candidates hoping to make it on the March 17 primary ballot have another week to collect the required signatures from local registered voters, but those hoping for the coveted first spot filed that paperwork Monday morning.

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In this July 26, 2017 file photo, Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan speaks at a news conference at the state capitol in Springfield, Illinois. (Justin Fowler / The State Journal-Register via AP, File)

The sight of FBI agents hauling bags of evidence from an office on the Democratic side of the Capitol building this week may have startled the normally unflappable House Speaker Michael Madigan.

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In this undated file photo, state Sen. Martin Sandoval speaks with WTTW News.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has honed in on another powerful elected official from Chicago, but it isn’t saying why.

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Tuesday marks day two of the semi-annual Cook County tax sale, where those delinquent on their property taxes have their liens sold to private investors, who can then collect massive interest rates. A push to change the system by some public officials has simply raised more questions.