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(Photo by Lightscape / Unsplash)

Chicago bars will once again be able serve customers indoors starting Thursday, as Mayor Lori Lightfoot moved to lift restrictions after a drop in the number of confirmed cases of the coronavirus.

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(skeeze / Pixabay)

A Supreme Court confirmation battle rages. President Trump won’t commit to a peaceful transfer of power should he lose. Chicago reacts to the Breonna Taylor decision, and Bears fans mourn the death of the legendary Gale Sayers.

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(Regina Shanklin / Pixabay)

Several aldermen on Friday urged Chicago’s chief financial officer to dip into the city’s $900 million savings account to wipe out the massive budget shortfall caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

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The Rev. Michael Pfleger speaks with a Chicago police officer outside St. Sabina Church during a protest over the grand jury decision in the Breonna Taylor case on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. (WTTW News)

The Breonna Taylor decision. Chicago’s massive budget shortfall. A Supreme Court battle ahead. Our politics team has the latest on those stories and more in this week’s roundtable.

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Mayor Lori Lightfoot speaks at a press conference after a Kentucky grand jury released its findings on the police shooting of Breonna Taylor on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. (WTTW News)

Mayor Lori Lightfoot urged Chicagoans to observe a moment of silence at 7 p.m. Wednesday to honor Breonna Taylor, hours after a Kentucky grand jury declined to indict three police officers for their role in her death.

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(WTTW News)

Commonwealth Edison announced Tuesday it will not shut off electricity in homes amid the coronavirus and recession — quickly meeting a key condition set by Mayor Lori Lightfoot if the utility giant is to extend its city contract.

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(Jürgen Polle / Pixabay)

Chicago’s chief financial officer warned aldermen Monday that taxing big firms and financial transactions would not help dig the city out of a massive budget hole caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

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(WTTW News)

“This is an opportunity to get this right,” said Ald. Byron Sigcho Lopez (25th Ward), who vowed not to allow developers to dominate the discussion.

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(WTTW News)

According to census numbers, Chicago is currently performing at a 59% response rate. But the city risks an undercount, especially in predominantly African American and Latino neighborhoods.

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A screenshot from a video shown to the media on Thursday, June 11, 2020 shows a Chicago police officer lying down inside the office of U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush. (WTTW News via City of Chicago)

It is past time for investigators to complete their probe into the conduct of 13 officers who lounged, slept and snacked in the burglarized office of U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush as unrest swept the city in June, Mayor Lori Lightfoot said Monday.

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(Andrés Rodríguez / Pixabay)

A push to build a first-of-its-kind workforce to conduct community-level contact tracing is months behind schedule, even as health officials brace for a surge in infections at the start of the traditional flu season.

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(WTTW News)

The city’s Affordable Requirements Ordinance created just 1,049 homes in 13 years by requiring some developers to set aside units for low- and moderate-income Chicagoans, but that has barely dented the city’s affordable housing gap, according to a new report.

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(Quinn Kampschroer / Pixabay)

Eric Trump, the president’s son, twice texted Mayor Lori Lightfoot to thank her for taking steps to protect Trump Tower in downtown Chicago after violent protests.

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(WTTW News)

Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Wednesday blasted Attorney General William Barr for claiming that President Donald Trump’s decision to send approximately 100 federal agents to Chicago was responsible for a drop in homicides.

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U.S. Attorney General William Barr speaks about Operation Legend in Chicago on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. (Pool camera)

U.S. Attorney General William Barr said 500 arrests have been made and 124 defendants charged in federal court in connection with Operation Legend, a partnership between federal and local law enforcement agencies aimed at combating violent crime.

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(ArtisticOperations / Pixabay)

Beyond first-day jitters, Chicago educators expressed concerns over stable internet connections and checking in with students about COVID-19 as classes in Chicago Public Schools resumed Tuesday for a fall unlike any other.