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President Donald Trump speaks the press about acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker in November 2018.

A law passed in 1976 gives the president authority to declare a national emergency. President Donald Trump has said he’d use the declaration to free up $5 billion to fund a border wall at the Mexican border.

Chief judge ‘deeply concerned’ shutdown may affect ability to ‘ensure timely justice’

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Dirksen United States Courthouse (Ken Lund / Flickr)

If the partial government shutdown lasts through next week, federal courts in Chicago and across the country may have to delay pay and limit operations.

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The federal shutdown is causing a lot of worries among government employees, including TSA agents. How workers in Chicago are reacting.

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The Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield (Daniel Schwen / Wikimedia Commons)

The ongoing partial shutdown of the federal government has prevented visitors from touring Abraham Lincoln’s former home in Springfield. 

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President Donald Trump could begin his second year in office with a government shutdown. An assessment of his first year, and a look ahead.

Congressmen Foster, Roskam on Iran Nuclear Deal, Planned Parenthood Funding, More

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Congressmen Bill Foster, left, and Peter Roskam

Congress reconvenes next Tuesday after a five-week recess, and there are some weighty and urgent matters to attend to, including yet another debt ceiling fiscal cliff. Joining us to share their thoughts on these and other issues are Congressman Bill Foster (D-11th); and Congressman Peter Roskam (R-6th).

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Gov. Bruce Rauner on Tuesday held a press conference to lay blame for the weeks-long partial state government shutdown at the feet of House Speaker Mike Madigan, and to decry lawmakers for taking a pay raise when there's no budget in place. We'll get the latest Springfield news from Chicago Tonight's Amanda Vinicky.

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Illinois State Capitol

This is week three of the partial state government shutdown. Carol Marin talks with four lawmakers about whether a compromise is in the foreseeable future.

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State lawmakers are expected to meet this week to consider a temporary, one-month budget in an effort to stave off the devastating effects of a government shutdown. But as the budget stalemate between Gov. Bruce Rauner and the Democrat-controlled General Assembly continues with no clear resolution in sight, who wins and who loses? 

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Lawmakers left Springfield for the Fourth of July weekend without a budget deal in place triggering a partial government shutdown. We talk with legislators from both sides of the aisle about what to expect if the impasse continues and what's on the session's agenda this week to resolve the fiscal crisis.

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The state's failure to reach a budget agreement has caused a government shutdown, and now top officials are hashing out in court what exactly can and can't stay open. Medicaid and social service providers are in limbo wondering if they and other government providers will be able to make payroll and stay open, as the legislative standoff drags on. 

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We’ll talk about the latest developments in Springfield with veteran reporter Carol Marin and Springfield correspondent Amanda Vinicky. It’ll be a whooper of day as a state government shutdown appears increasingly likely because Tuesday is the final day in the state’s current budget. Meanwhile, Chicago Public Schools managed to pay its $634 million pension payment Tuesday afternoon. 

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With no budget and only weeks before the new fiscal year starts, the state is careening toward a government shutdown. Who would that impact? 

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Just how serious is the government shutdown? Federal employees missing paychecks will feel it, but what about the economy as a whole? And who is really to blame? We have analysis.