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A sample farmers market to-go box. (Courtesy of Closed Loop Farms)

Closed Loop Farms is leading a group of local food producers to deliver everything from Michelin-worthy greens to naturally fermented sodas directly to your door.

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(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jeffrey Parkinson)

As the COVID-19 crisis continues to unfold and layoffs and business closures mount, food pantries all over Illinois are bracing for increased need.

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Grocers are setting aside shopping hours for seniors, to protect them from COVID-19. (Lynn Friedman / Flickr)

A number of grocers and big-box retailers have announced special shopping hours for senior citizens and others vulnerable to COVID-19 to ensure less crowded situations, as well as access to essential items.

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(WTTW News)

Panic-buying is taking hold of shoppers across the country. Already, toilet paper and hand sanitizer are flying off store shelves. How are grocery stores maintaining their supplies? And will their supply chains hold up under the strain of the crisis?

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(Courtesy of TipsySpace)

TipsySpace has created a toilet roll cake that’s worthy of bingeing, not hoarding, and it’s so authentic looking, customers have nearly mistaken it for the real thing on pickup.

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(jacme31 / Flickr)

Food continues to create a sense of community even during these days of social isolation, with strangers swapping free sourdough starter.

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(WTTW News)

The various state and city coronavirus restrictions are having a dramatic impact on local businesses, especially mom-and-pop restaurants and stores. We visit Chinatown to see how businesses are coping with the changes.

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(WTTW News)

We talk about the state of the restaurant industry with Alpana Singh, host of the WTTW restaurant review show “Check, Please!” and the owner of Terra and Vine restaurant in Evanston.

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Rhine Hall Distillery general manager Adira Hanna (WTTW News)

Rhine Hall Distillery is known for its high-end fruit brandies, but business has slowed because of the coronavirus. Now, the distillery is one of several that’s shifting its production from spirits to sanitizer. We go for a look.

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In this March 16, 2020 photo provided by Jamie Lee Finch, a laptop on a desk in Nashville, Tenn., shows people gathered together online for a virtual happy hour. (Jamie Lee Finch via AP)

With bars shuttered and stressed-out workers stuck at home, companies and friend groups across the U.S. are holding happy hours over video chat to commiserate and keep spirits high amid the new coronavirus pandemic. 

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Shoppers line up outside Costco in Lincoln Park on Monday, March 16, 2020. (WTTW News)

Illinois restaurants and bars are preparing for their last call for dine-in business until at least the end of the month. Meanwhile, grocers big and small are scrambling to restock shelves.

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Gov. J.B. Pritkzer announces the closure of all Illinois schools during an update on the coronavirus on Friday, March 13, 2020. (WTTW News)

The drastic measure comes as officials announced the number of COVID-19 cases in Illinois has risen to 93. Restaurants can still serve food via delivery, or curbside pick-up. “This is another hard step to take,” Gov. J.B. Pritzker said in a statement.

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(tommy pixel / Pixabay)

To help alleviate the impact of coronavirus-related declines in restaurant sales, Chicago-based Grubhub announced a temporary change to its fee structure and a charitable fund to support impacted restaurants and drivers nationwide.

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(Ken Lund / Flickr)

The economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic is being felt by industries and businesses in Chicago and across Illinois, from large hotel chains and restaurants to independent movie theaters and music venues. 

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In this Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020, photo, Richard Butler and his fiance Amber laugh while they have breakfast in an apartment a friend is letting them live in on Chicago’s South Side. (AP Photo / Charles Rex Arbogast)

New Trump administration rules taking effect April 1 put hundreds of thousands of people at risk of losing their food stamp benefits. They hit particularly hard in places like Illinois, where roughly 90,000 will be affected statewide.

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(Nick Normal / Flickr)

Small actions can add up to meaningful change in the race to avert a climate crisis. But Chicago is lagging when it comes to some of the simplest solutions.

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