|
Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell testifies during a Senate Banking Committee hearing, Thursday Sept. 24, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington about the CARES Act and the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic. (Drew Angerer / Pool via AP)

The Fed announced no new actions after its latest policy meeting but left the door open to provide further assistance in the coming months. 

|
(NikolayFrolochkin / Pixabay)

According to the Federal Reserve, the gap between the rich and the not-so-rich in the U.S. is getting wider. What that new data may mean for economic inequality in America. 

|
Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell testifies during a Senate Banking Committee hearing, Thursday Sept. 24, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington about the CARES Act and the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic. (Drew Angerer / Pool via AP)

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell warned Tuesday that a tentative recovery from the pandemic recession could falter unless the federal government supplies additional economic support.

|
(Jason Rogers / Flickr)

Whether piled up in change jars, cup holders or couch crevices, coins are not circulating, and that makes it difficult for businesses to deal in cash, the U.S. Coin Task Force says. Here’s how to help.

|
Paul Krugman appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020. (WTTW News)

A conversation with with the Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times opinion columnist about his new book, “Arguing With Zombies: Economics, Politics, and the Fight for a Better Future.”

|
The Eccles Building in Washington D.C. serves as the headquarters of the Federal Reserve. (AgnosticPreachersKid / Wikimedia Commons)

While the U.S. economy continues its record-breaking expansion, some wonder whether the Fed reacted to softening global markets or perhaps even pressure from President Donald Trump.

|
In this June 18, 2019, photo people walk past Fidelity Investments news scroll board, showing a favorable outlook in the US stock markets, in the Financial District of Boston. (AP Photo / Charles Krupa)

The Fed under Chairman Jerome Powell has signaled that rising economic pressures — notably from President Donald Trump’s trade wars and from a global slowdown — have become cause for concern. So has an inflation rate that remains chronically below the Fed’s target level.

|
Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell speaks Tuesday, June 4, 2019 at a conference involving its review of its interest-rate policy strategy and communications in Chicago. (AP Photo / Kiichiro Sato)

Chairman Jerome Powell didn’t explicitly say what the Federal Reserve would do. But expectations are rising that the Fed will cut rates at least once and possibly two or more times before year’s end, in part because of the consequences of the trade war. 

|
“Nothing will deter us from doing what we think is the right thing to do,” Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2018.

The Federal Reserve hikes its benchmark interest rate for the fourth time this year, by one-quarter of 1 percent to 2.5 percent. We discuss the outlook for the markets and the economy.

|
President Donald Trump: “I think the Fed has gone crazy.”

A market that has grown used to cheap money over the past decade is becoming increasingly concerned that the Federal Reserve will aggressively raise benchmark interest rates.

|
“We have successfully completed negotiations on a brand-new deal to terminate and replace NAFTA,” President Donald Trump announced Monday, Oct. 1, 2018.

President Donald Trump is boasting a booming economy, but will higher interest rates stop it?

|

While Fed Chair Janet Yellen ends her tenure on an upbeat note, are there storm clouds ahead for the economy?

|

Median incomes in America are on the rise. What will be the response of a Federal Reserve Board with vacancies?

|

Another record-setting day on Wall Street. What’s propelling the stock surge—and can it last?

|

The Federal Reserve is expected to raise the benchmark interest rate again. What that means about the U.S. economy.

|

Last week’s rate hike is a sign of optimism over growth in the U.S. economy. But how will it impact borrowing, like mortgage and credit card rates?