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(WTTW News)

Chicago officials have begun using the state’s method to calculate the single most important benchmark for tracking the spread of the coronavirus — positivity rates — as confirmed cases of the virus continue to rise statewide.

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The exterior of a warehouse in the Humboldt Park neighborhood of Chicago, where officials say an illegal party was shut down over the weekend. (WTTW News)

Inspectors shut down an illegal party at a Humboldt Park warehouse where revelers were not wearing masks or following social distancing rules, city officials said Monday.

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(WTTW News)

Illinois and Chicago officials disagree on how to calculate the single most important benchmark for tracking the spread of the coronavirus, even as the number of confirmed cases of the virus continues to rise statewide.

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General Iron’s Lincoln Park facility. (WTTW News)

The city outlined a laundry list of rules General Iron would have to abide by in order to start up its metal shredding operation on the Southeast Side, while neighbors continue to push officials to deny the company's permit application — which has yet to be filed.

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(Photo by Lightscape / Unsplash)

Chicago bars will no longer be able to serve customers indoors starting Friday as part of a rollback ordered by Mayor Lori Lightfoot following an increase in the number of coronavirus cases.

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(Zoltan Matuska / Pixabay)

With temperatures set to soar in Chicago in the coming days, Dr. Allison Arwady reassured residents that it’s “safe and appropriate” to use air conditioning in their apartments and homes without risking the spread of COVID-19.

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(Bert Kaufmann / Wikimedia)

Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Wednesday delivered a blunt warning to young adults in Chicago: you are spreading the coronavirus, and threatening the tentative progress Chicago has made in fighting the pandemic.

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(WTTW News)

An analysis of city data shows the majority of Chicago ZIP codes have positivity rates at or below those needed move into phase four, but one has a rate of 15.3%. We discuss metrics and reopening with Chicago’s top doctor.

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(Daniel Dionne / Flickr)

Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Monday that Chicago will move into phase four of its reopening plan Friday, along with the rest of the state, but continued to hammer home her themes of vigilance and caution.

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(Bert Kaufmann / Wikimedia)

Nine days after Chicago began reopening — and after days of massive protests against police brutality and unrest — the rate of confirmed cases of the coronavirus is still dropping, city health officials said Friday.

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Dr. Allison Arwady, commisioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health appears on “Chicago Tonight” via Zoom on Wednesday, June 3, 2020. (WTTW News)

Chicago has officially moved into phase three of its reopening plan. We discuss the public health implications of reopening with Dr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health.

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(Ken Teegardin / Flickr)

The city will expand mental health treatment for people struggling to cope during the coronavirus pandemic, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Thursday.

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(Photo by David Mao on Unsplash)

City officials on Monday launched a new web-based application they say was designed to help those suffering from the coronavirus while laying the groundwork for a massive vaccination campaign.

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A still image from a video taken of the demolition of the Crawford Coal Plant smokestack, April 11, 2020. (Alejandro Reyes / YouTube)

The plume of dust that coated homes in Little Village after the botched demolition of a coal plant smokestack did not threaten residents’ health, according to final test results released Monday by the city of Chicago.

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(Photo by Igor Miske on Unsplash)

Sharing a meal, attending a funeral and celebrating a birthday. In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, these otherwise innocuous activities can result in the spread of the highly contagious virus, according to a new report.

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This illustration provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in January 2020 shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

People without health insurance can receive care if they think they have the novel coronavirus, and no patient will be turned away because of inability to pay, according to the Chicago Department of Public Health.

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