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The Candida auris fungus is potentially deadly and can cause a number of infections, some of which are drug-resistant. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Cases of Candida auris in Chicago have been treatable with antifungal medications, says the chief medical officer for the city’s Department of Public Health.  

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Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Julie Morita appears on “Chicago Tonight” on April 11, 2019.

Dr. Julie Morita is moving on after two decades at the Chicago Department of Public Health. She tells us about her future plans, and discusses current threats to the city’s health.

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(flockine / Pixabay)

Caring for a sick family member, such as a child, is the top reason why parents take off work, according to a new citywide survey. Yet nearly 40 percent of working parents don’t have paid leave.

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The Chicago Department of Public Health is investigating a salmonella outbreak at Supermercado Rivera, located at 4334 W. 51st St. (Google Maps)

The Chicago Department of Public Health is investigating an outbreak of salmonella after six people who consumed food from the kitchen counter at Supermercado Rivera became sick late last month.

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(Free-Photos / Pixabay)

Chicago parents say gun violence, bullying and poverty are among the top 10 social issues affecting the city’s youth, according to a citywide survey.

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An overhead view of Watco's storage terminal at 2926 E. 126th St. in Chicago. (Google)

Watco Transloading says it will no longer handle materials with high concentrations of manganese, a heavy metal used in steelmaking that can cause brain damage at high exposure levels. 

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(Google Maps)

Chicago facilities that process potentially harmful industrial materials must now take further steps to ensure they aren’t polluting surrounding neighborhoods.

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(flockine / Pixabay)

The flu can keep kids out of school and parents out of work. So why do some parents chose not to get their children vaccinated against it? A new citywide survey offers some insight.

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(yc0407206360 / Pixabay)

The city’s teen birth rate has dropped 70 percent since 2000, according to city officials, but African-American and Latina teens are more than five times as likely to give birth than their white peers.

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An overhead view of Watco's storage terminal at 2926 E. 126th St. in Chicago. (Google)

After finding high levels of brain-damaging manganese near Watco Transloading’s facility on the Southeast Side of Chicago, the EPA has accused the company of violating the Clean Air Act. 

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An overhead view of Watco's storage terminal at 2926 E. 126th St. in Chicago. (Google)

Watco Transloading faces up to $20,000 in city fines for failing to control emissions of brain-damaging manganese from its storage facility along the Calumet River. 

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An overhead view of Watco's storage terminal at 2926 E. 126th St. in Chicago. (Google)

As regulators continue to monitor manganese emissions at S.H. Bell Co., new air monitoring data shows alarming levels of the brain-damaging heavy metal near another industrial facility in the area.

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(Pixabay)

Adults in Chicago think drug and alcohol abuse, obesity and depression are among the top 10 health problems facing the city’s youth, according to a new citywide survey.

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A map of the zones included in the EPA’s soil testing on the Southeast Side (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency)

The ongoing probe into harmful levels of brain-damaging manganese on Chicago’s Southeast Side has turned up another, more familiar neurotoxin: lead.

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(Google Maps)

Soil samples have been collected from more than 100 properties as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency continues to assess the threat posed by brain-damaging manganese emitted from nearby industrial sites.

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(Google Maps)

As part of its investigation into high levels of manganese on the Southeast Side, the EPA will hold an open house this week to talk about soil sampling and sign residents up for testing.