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(Freestocks-photos / Pixabay)

Illinois residents open up about their experiences with addiction and recovery in a new statewide video campaign that seeks to connect people who use drugs with services. 

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Aaron Lawlor appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Sept. 24, 2019.

He was a fast-rising Republican politician whose career came crashing to a halt last year. Now sober, Aaron Lawlor says he has given up politics but regained his life – and he’s eager to tell his story.

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(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)

Opioid manufacturers carried out unfair and deceptive marketing campaigns while distributors flooded Illinois with opioids, according to a lawsuit filed this week by Illinois Attorney General Kwame Raoul.

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(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)

A newly launched website seeks to convey the seriousness of the opioid epidemic locally while providing resources and honoring those who have died, says Dr. Kiran Joshi of the Cook County Department of Public Health.

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In this March 13, 2019 file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar testifies before a House Appropriations subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Susan Walsh)

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said the goal is to make it easier to share a patient’s drug treatment history with doctors treating that person for other problems. 

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(Marco Verch Professional Photographer and Speaker / Flickr)

A new law signed by Gov. J.B. Pritzker legalizes syringe exchange programs in Illinois, opening the door to an increase in operations aiming to serve a community at risk of overdoses and infection from unsafe supplies.

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(valelopardo / Pixabay)

More than 70,000 people died from drug overdoses in the U.S. in 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Now, a task force is recommending clinicians ask adult patients about illicit drug use.

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(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)

A yearslong investigation by the Washington Post offers a state-by-state snapshot of the opioid crisis. What the data says about Illinois – and what the state is doing to fight back.

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“I need help with direct stuff like free maintenance programs, a stable home, legal help so I can sit and get grounded, and relax. I need a place to sit down.” (Photo by Chicago Recovery Alliance participant.)

People who inject drugs typically aren’t part of traditional advocacy because of risks associated with going public. But a local research project allows them to share their experiences without the fear of potential repercussions.

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(babilkulesi / Pixabay)

As Illinois prepares to expand gambling to every corner of the state – including slot machines at O’Hare and Midway airports – supporters tout the generation of much-needed revenue to help plug a massive budget deficit. But at what cost?

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(Eric Molina / Flickr)

A new bill aims to fix the state’s “ambiguous” law over syringe exchange programs. Public support for such programs remains low, but advocates say they can offer critical help to those in need.

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Last year, about 5,400 detainees at Cook County Jail received treatment for opioid use – an average of 375-400 each month. The county will be able to expand its services for opioid use disorder, thanks to a new grant. 

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Clean out your medicine cabinet and safely dispose of unused prescriptions during a biannual event that’s collected more than 9 million pounds of pills since its 2010 launch.

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(The Javorac / Flickr)

The U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration is awarding Illinois $15 million to continue combating the opioid crisis across the state through prevention, treatment and recovery efforts.

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Robert J. Bell, U.S. DEA associate special agent in charge of the Chicago field division office, announces Thursday, Feb. 14 the launch of a yearlong digital billboard campaign against the opioid epidemic. (Kristen Thometz / Chicago Tonight)

As part of its ongoing efforts to combat the opioid epidemic, the Drug Enforcement Agency announced Thursday it’s launching a yearlong digital billboard campaign across the Chicago area.

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(Adam / Wikimedia Commons)

Qualified clinicians can receive up to $75,000 in student loan repayment through a new federal program. In exchange, they must serve three years on the front lines of the opioid crisis in underserved communities.

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