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Robert J. Bell, U.S. DEA associate special agent in charge of the Chicago field division office, announces Thursday, Feb. 14 the launch of a yearlong digital billboard campaign against the opioid epidemic. (Kristen Thometz / Chicago Tonight)

As part of its ongoing efforts to combat the opioid epidemic, the Drug Enforcement Agency announced Thursday it’s launching a yearlong digital billboard campaign across the Chicago area.

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(Adam / Wikimedia Commons)

Qualified clinicians can receive up to $75,000 in student loan repayment through a new federal program. In exchange, they must serve three years on the front lines of the opioid crisis in underserved communities.

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In Illinois, medical marijuana can now be used as a painkiller to replace opioids. We hear from a co-sponsor of the new law.

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Community health educator Karen Daniels assembles a naloxone kit on Friday, Dec. 7, 2018. (Kristen Thometz / Chicago Tonight)

Dozens of Chicagoans trained to recognize and respond to opioid overdoses in their communities have distributed more than 7,000 naloxone kits across the city since March.

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(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)

Do you have old prescription medicines in your cabinet? Don’t flush them down the toilet or throw them in the trash. Instead, dispose of them Saturday, no questions asked, at DEA-sponsored sites. 

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NARCAN® Nasal Spray (Courtesy of Adapt Pharma)

The Chicago Police Department will outfit officers in a half-dozen South and West Side districts with an opioid overdose-reversal medicine as part of a $2 million federal grant.

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(Courtesy of Shatterproof)

“People with this disease are ashamed,” said Gary Mendell, whose son struggled with addiction. He hopes Saturday’s race shows people struggling with addiction they are not alone. “We care about you.”

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(The Javorac / Flickr)

The state of Illinois is getting a boost in its efforts to combat the opioid epidemic, thanks to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 

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A law signed Tuesday by Gov. Bruce Rauner opens access to cannabis to a new raft of patients—anyone who would otherwise be prescribed an opioid.

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Gov. Bruce Rauner says a suite of new laws will “dramatically improve” mental health and addiction treatment in Illinois as part of a larger effort to address the state’s opioid crisis.

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(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)

From decreasing access to opioids, to identifying patients at risk of addiction: A look at what local hospitals are doing in the fight against opioid addiction.

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Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart appears on “Chicago Tonight” on July 13, 2017.

“This crisis touches the lives of so many – almost everyone knows someone struggling with an opioid addiction,” said Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart. “I hope this podcast opens eyes and minds to how easily an opioid addiction can happen and how hard it can be to stop.”

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(markusspiske / Pixabay)

Public housing across the U.S. will become smoke-free at the end of the month. What that means for some 60,000 residents in Chicago.

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A wellness center’s program addresses the unique needs of pregnant women with substance use disorders. This week, the group celebrated a milestone.

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(The Javorac / Flickr)

Opioid withdrawal symptoms have typically been treated with another narcotic, but a newly approved drug offers what a local doctor calls a “clean break” for patients.

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Illinois has won long sought-after permission from the federal government to take a more flexible approach to treating opioid disorders, drug abuse and other behavioral health issues.

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