7 States Added to Chicago’s Travel Order, Including Michigan: Officials

A map illustrating Chicago’s updated travel order. (Credit: Chicago Department of Public Health)A map illustrating Chicago’s updated travel order. (Credit: Chicago Department of Public Health)

Visitors to Chicago from seven additional states, including Michigan, now have to quarantine for 10 days or record a negative test for COVID-19, according to the city’s travel order, updated on Tuesday.

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Dr. Allison Arwady, the commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, said the uptick in virus cases in Michigan is of special concern because it appears to be driven in part by the spread of more transmissible variants of COVID-19.

Cases have risen 112% in Michigan during the past 14 days and hospitalizations have jumped 52%, Arwady said.

Along with visitors from Michigan, travelers from Idaho, Montana, Minnesota, West Virginia, Maryland and Maine must either quarantine for 10 days or record a negative COVID-19 test result within 72 hours of arrival, according to the order. In all, 26 states are covered by the travel order.

However, visitors from Utah, Arizona, Texas, Nebraska, the District of Columbia and Kentucky no longer have to quarantine or record a negative test, according to the order.

Visitors to Chicago who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 are not covered by the travel order.

"Please do not travel until you are fully vaccinated," Arwady said.

Everyone must still wear masks, follow social distancing rules and avoid large gatherings, according to the city’s rules.

Illinois is averaging approximately 15 new cases per day based on a seven-day rolling average, according to city data.

Violators of the quarantine order could face fines of $100 to $500 per day for a maximum fine of $7,000, according to Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s office. However, city officials have said they’re relying on an education campaign rather than an enforcement effort. No one has been cited for violating the order, which was first announced in July.

Travel by essential workers and students commuting to class is exempt from the order, according to the mayor’s office, as is travel to obtain medical care or exchange children subject to a shared custody order.

Contact Heather Cherone: @HeatherCherone | (773) 569-1863 | [email protected]


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