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Denise Gonzalez-Mendez (WTTW News)

The Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring program has been making matches in Chicago since 1967, but a lot has changed over the years. Many of the kids now come from Spanish-speaking households, and the organization is looking for more “bigs” who speak their language to volunteer.

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(WTTW News)

As the city begins to stir from its COVID-19 slumber, we talk with local journalists about how the reopening is impacting Latino communities.

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(WTTW News)

The Chicago City Council on Wednesday wasted no time in symbolically turning the page on the Trump administration by voting to expand protections for undocumented immigrants that had been stalled by the former president’s crackdown.

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What to expect from the Biden administration, including immigration reform. And in a new series called “Neighbors,” we introduce you to a family that’s been feeding its community for decades.

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Jesus del Toro, director and general manager of La Raza newspaper, and Jackie Serrato, editor-in-chief of the South Side Weekly newspaper, discuss Inauguration Day and the big changes already underway.

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Lolly and Bob Rodriguez (Family photo)

For more than four decades, the Rodriguez family has run a community food pantry out of their East Side garage with little more than their own hands.

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(WTTW News)

The number of distribution centers being built in the Chicago area is on the rise. Supporters say they can create jobs in places that have long faced disinvestment and unemployment. But critics say they aren’t always good jobs.

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(WTTW News via CNN)

President Joe Biden is expected to announce legislation this week that would overhaul the country’s immigration laws. The plan comes after a chaotic four years for immigration activists and lawyers under the Trump administration.

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(WTTW News)

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that one-third of Chicago’s Latinos — the majority of them women — are living in poverty. We explore the relationship between poverty and domestic violence.

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The link between poverty and domestic violence. A scathing report on Trump’s family separation policy. A Mexican printmaking tradition in Chicago. And how COVID-19 can spark creative solutions.

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(WTTW News via CNN)

A scathing report on the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” immigration policy that separated thousands of families at the border. 

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Elizabeth Morales (WTTW News)

The founder of an arts organization in Little Village gives us the last word on how adversity can spark creative solutions.

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Language barriers creating tech problems for students. The first Chicagoan to be vaccinated against COVID-19. How interest in houseplants has blossomed. A virtual bodega showcases local artists.

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(ArtisticOperations / Pixabay)

Since Chicago Public Schools were closed to in-person learning in March, the move to remote learning has been difficult for many families. But for the CPS families who speak Spanish at home, there is an additional barrier. 

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René Arceo (WTTW News)

The Mexican tradition of printmaking is alive and well at a Chicago printing press run by a retired public school teacher. 

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Dr. Marina Del Rios receives the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by city officials on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020 at The Loretto Hospital. (WTTW News)

Dr. Marina Del Rios was the first person in Chicago to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 after receiving her second dose of the Pfizer vaccine Tuesday. “I felt reassured that this was safe and efficacious,” she said.