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U.S. Rep. Jesus “Chuy” Garcia speaks with WTTW News on Thursday, March 26, 2020.

As a vote on the largest economic stimulus package in American history approaches in the U.S. House of Representatives, one Chicago congressman says he’s behind it.

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(WTTW News)

As people increasingly stay home, many social service agencies are adapting in order to continue serving their communities. We check in on the Indo-American Center in Chicago’s West Ridge neighborhood.

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In this Oct. 5, 2019 file photo, migrants seeking asylum wait in line with their case paperwork during a weekly trip by volunteers, lawyers, paralegals and interpreters to the migrant campsite outside El Puente Nuevo in Matamoros, Mexico. (Denise Cathey / The Brownsville Herald via AP, File)

Dealing a significant blow to a signature Trump administration immigration policy, a federal appeals court ruled Friday that the government can no longer make asylum seekers wait in Mexico while their cases wind through the U.S. immigration courts.

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Meydi Guzman Rivas, left, and Sara Huser. (WTTW News)

We meet an immigrant teen seeking asylum, and the suburban community that’s lending a hand.

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In this Jan. 31, 2019, file photo, hundreds of people overflow onto the sidewalk in a line snaking around the block outside a U.S. immigration office with numerous courtrooms in San Francisco. (AP Photo / Eric Risberg, File)

The guidelines that aim to determine whether immigrants seeking legal residency are likely to become a government burden are part of the Trump administration’s broader effort to reduce immigration, particularly among poorer people.

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In this Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020, photo, Sai Kyaw, an immigrant from Myanmar, also known as Burma, stands for a photograph in Boston at his restaurant called Yoma. Kyaw said new travel restrictions are preventing his brother, sister and their families from joining him in Massachusetts after nearly a dozen years in the visa application process. (AP Photo / Steven Senne)

A Trump administration policy is expected to all but shut down family based immigration from Myanmar, also known as Burma, as well as Nigeria, Kyrgyzstan and Eritrea. The policy also restricts visas from Sudan and Tanzania.

New York Times reports specialized ICE Agents being sent to Chicago, sanctuary cities

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In this July 8, 2019, file photo, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer looks on during an operation in Escondido, California. (AP Photo / Gregory Bull, File)

President Donald Trump will deploy specialized U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement tactical units to nearly a dozen so-called sanctuary cities, including Chicago, according to The New York Times.  

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The Pilsen post office at 1859 S. Ashland Ave., Chicago. (WTTW News)

Community leaders are pushing the postal service for answers – and changes – after a customer reported a clerk who refused to help Spanish-speaking customers.

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A migrant camp in Matamoros, Mexico, where thousands of asylum-seekers have been living for months as they wait for their court hearings. The camp is without running water or working toilets. (Credit: Maria Ines Zamudio)

A year after the start of the “Remain in Mexico” policy, we talk with a Chicago reporter returning from a border town. 

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U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. (AP Photo / Markus Schreiber)

President Donald Trump said Wednesday the U.S. would soon be imposing visa restrictions on more countries — though it’s not clear yet how many nations will be affected by his expansion of the travel ban.

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Mayor Lori Lightfoot speaks to the media after a City Council meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. (WTTW News)

Undocumented immigrants stand to gain more protections in Chicago after City Council approved an ordinance Wednesday. The meeting also featured a tense debate over contracting for LGBTQ business owners.

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President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020, in Toledo, Ohio. (AP Photo / Jacquelyn Martin)

The White House is considering dramatically expanding its much-litigated travel ban to additional countries amid a renewed election-year focus on immigration by President Donald Trump, according to six people familiar with the deliberations.

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Nestor Gomez tells his story “Growing Another Heart” at a Moth StorySlam. (Credit: The Moth)

Live storytelling has become its own competitive sport, and it’s drawing crowds across the country. We meet the winningest storyteller in Chicago.

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Former White House national security aide Fiona Hill testifies before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, during a public impeachment hearing of President Donald Trump’s efforts to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents. (AP Photo / Susan Walsh)

Several witnesses who testified in the House impeachment inquiry this week chose to highlight their immigrant backgrounds, sharing their families’ stories in highly personal opening statements. 

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In this Sept. 25, 2019, file photo, Army veteran Miguel Perez Jr. speaks with reporters after a citizenship hearing with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in Chicago. (Ashlee Rezin Garcia / Chicago Sun-Times via AP, File)

An Army veteran deported to Mexico after serving time in prison for a drug conviction became a U.S. citizen on Friday. Miguel Perez Jr. held up his citizenship certificate for the cameras after being sworn in, saying, “Here it is.”

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Army veteran Miguel Perez appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Sept. 30, 2019.

Miguel Perez came to the U.S. from Mexico as a child, and served in Afghanistan in the early 2000s. After being deported last year, he was pardoned by Gov. J.B. Pritzker and is now back in Chicago. He joins us in discussion.