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U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. (AP Photo / Markus Schreiber)

President Donald Trump said Wednesday the U.S. would soon be imposing visa restrictions on more countries — though it’s not clear yet how many nations will be affected by his expansion of the travel ban.

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Mayor Lori Lightfoot speaks to the media after a City Council meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. (WTTW News)

Undocumented immigrants stand to gain more protections in Chicago after City Council approved an ordinance Wednesday. The meeting also featured a tense debate over contracting for LGBTQ business owners.

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President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020, in Toledo, Ohio. (AP Photo / Jacquelyn Martin)

The White House is considering dramatically expanding its much-litigated travel ban to additional countries amid a renewed election-year focus on immigration by President Donald Trump, according to six people familiar with the deliberations.

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Nestor Gomez tells his story “Growing Another Heart” at a Moth StorySlam. (Credit: The Moth)

Live storytelling has become its own competitive sport, and it’s drawing crowds across the country. We meet the winningest storyteller in Chicago.

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Former White House national security aide Fiona Hill testifies before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, during a public impeachment hearing of President Donald Trump’s efforts to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents. (AP Photo / Susan Walsh)

Several witnesses who testified in the House impeachment inquiry this week chose to highlight their immigrant backgrounds, sharing their families’ stories in highly personal opening statements. 

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In this Sept. 25, 2019, file photo, Army veteran Miguel Perez Jr. speaks with reporters after a citizenship hearing with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in Chicago. (Ashlee Rezin Garcia / Chicago Sun-Times via AP, File)

An Army veteran deported to Mexico after serving time in prison for a drug conviction became a U.S. citizen on Friday. Miguel Perez Jr. held up his citizenship certificate for the cameras after being sworn in, saying, “Here it is.”

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Army veteran Miguel Perez appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Sept. 30, 2019.

Miguel Perez came to the U.S. from Mexico as a child, and served in Afghanistan in the early 2000s. After being deported last year, he was pardoned by Gov. J.B. Pritzker and is now back in Chicago. He joins us in discussion.

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St. Mary of the Angels (Credit: Archdiocese of Chicago’s Joseph Cardinal Bernardin Archives and Records Center)

When driving along the Kennedy Expressway, you may have noticed massive churches that seem to almost line up with the curves and bends of the highway. Geoffrey Baer explains.

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In this Wednesday, June 5, 2019, file photo, Gov. J.B. Pritzker speaks in downtown Chicago. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky, File)

“I recognize this pardon is not a perfect solution, but it is the most just action to take to allow a U.S. veteran the opportunity to be treated fairly by the country he served,” Gov. J.B. Pritzker said.

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(Bridgeport Art Center / Arceo Press)

For decades, the southern border of the U.S. has been a flash point for conflicting points of view. Now, artists from both sides of the border – including Chicago – are navigating the rocky road of migration in “The Border Crossed Us.”

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Jesus “Chuy” Garcia appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Aug. 26, 2019.

U.S. Rep. Jesus “Chuy” Garcia has had a foot in both local and national politics for decades. Now representing Illinois’ 4th Congressional District, Garcia has become an outspoken critic of the Trump administration’s immigration policies. He joins us in discussion.

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Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson listens to a question as he stands next to a display board, Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, during a news conference in Seattle. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren)

Nineteen states, including Illinois, sued on Monday over the Trump administration’s effort to alter a federal agreement that limits how long immigrant children can be kept in detention.

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In this July 15, 2019, file photo, protesters hold signs outside of the Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children while members of Congress tour the facility in Homestead, Florida. (AP Photo / Lynne Sladky, File)

The Trump administration is moving to end an agreement limiting how long migrant children can be kept in detention, the president’s latest effort to curb immigration at the Mexican border.

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In this Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, photo, Dr. Jasmine Saavedra, a pediatrician at Esperanza Health Centers whose parents emigrated from Mexico in the 1980s, examines Alondra Marquez, a newborn baby in her clinic in Chicago. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky)

Doctors and public health experts warn of poor health and rising costs they say will come from sweeping Trump administration changes that would deny green cards to many immigrants who use Medicaid, as well as food stamps and other forms of public assistance. 

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Amid workplace raids, what responsibilities do employers have to verify immigration status? And what rights do workers have?

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Acting Director of United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Ken Cuccinelli, speaks during a briefing at the White House, Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

The Trump administration announced Monday it is moving forward with one of its most aggressive steps yet to restrict legal immigration: Denying green cards to many migrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance.

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