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House Democratic impeachment managers, from left, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo., Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., arrive for the start of the third day of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

It’s day two of opening arguments in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, and House managers are laying out their case for abuse of power. A former Supreme Court clerk offers his take on the proceedings so far.

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In this image from video, presiding officer Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)

Americans are sharply divided along party lines about whether President Donald Trump should be removed from office, and they doubt the Senate impeachment trial will do anything to change their minds, according to a new poll.

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U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. (AP Photo / Markus Schreiber)

President Donald Trump said Wednesday the U.S. would soon be imposing visa restrictions on more countries — though it’s not clear yet how many nations will be affected by his expansion of the travel ban.

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The U.S. flag flies over the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Sunday, Jan. 19, 2020. (AP Photo / Manuel Balce Ceneta)

A look at the main points Democrats are making as they argue for President Donald Trump’s removal from office, and Trump’s response as the defense team pushes for his speedy acquittal.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., arrives at the Senate for the start of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial quickly burst into a partisan fight Tuesday at the Capitol as Democrats objected strongly to rules proposed by the Republican leader for compressed arguments and a speedy trial.

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American flags blow in wind around the Washington Monument with the U.S. Capitol in the background at sunrise on Monday, Jan. 20, 2020, in Washington. The impeachment trial of President Donald Trump will resume in the U.S. Senate on Jan. 21.  (AP Photo / Jon Elswick)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday proposed a condensed, two-day calendar for each side to give opening arguments in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, ground rules that are raising objections from Democrats.

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In this Feb. 22, 2018 file photo, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi speaks to reporters outside the West Wing in Washington. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

President Donald Trump’s legal team for his Senate impeachment trial will include a pair of well-known attorneys who have vigorously defended Trump on television and played roles in some of the most consequential legal dramas in recent history.

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In this Dec. 2, 2019, file photo, Lev Parnas arrives at court in New York. Parnas, a close associate of President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, has provided a trove of text messages and photos to the House committee leading the impeachment inquiry. (AP Photo / Seth Wenig, File)

A close associate of President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani is claiming Trump was directly involved in the effort to pressure Ukraine to investigate Democratic rival Joe Biden.

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Clerk of the House Cheryl Johnson carries the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

The impeachment of President Donald Trump is the Senate’s challenge now. Look Thursday for a series of striking ceremonial matters to set up the Senate as a court of impeachment. 

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces the impeachment managers in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. (WTTW News via CNN)

After nearly a month of delay, the House of Representatives voted Wednesday to transmit articles of impeachment for the trial of President Donald Trump to the Senate. We discuss the latest and look ahead.

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., center, flanked by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., left, and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., speaks during a news conference to announce impeachment managers on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. (AP Photo / Susan Walsh)

The seven-member prosecution team will be led by the chairmen of the House impeachment proceedings, Reps. Adam Schiff of the Intelligence Committee and Jerry Nadler of the Judiciary Committee.

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Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arrives to meet with the Democratic Caucus at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

The U.S. House is set to vote Wednesday to send the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate, and pressure was mounting Tuesday on senators to call fresh witnesses for the historic trial.

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In this Dec. 4, 2019, file photo, light shines on the U.S. Capitol dome in Washington. (AP Photo / Patrick Semansky, File)

Here’s what to watch as the impeachment charges make their slow-motion journey to the Senate this week.

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Laura Albinson of Pasadena, Md., displays a message for members of the House as they leave the Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 10, 2020. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the House will take steps next week to transmit the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, ending a three-week standoff but confronting the Senate with only the third trial in U.S. history to remove a chief executive.

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President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020, in Toledo, Ohio. (AP Photo / Jacquelyn Martin)

The White House is considering dramatically expanding its much-litigated travel ban to additional countries amid a renewed election-year focus on immigration by President Donald Trump, according to six people familiar with the deliberations.

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Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., meets with reporters following escalation of tensions this week between the U.S. and Iran, Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

Reigniting a debate over who has the power to declare war, the Democratic-controlled House on Thursday approved a resolution asserting that President Donald Trump must seek approval from Congress before engaging in further military action against Iran.

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