|
 Former White House national security aide Fiona Hill returns from a break to testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

How has the impeachment testimony of former National Security Council adviser Fiona Hill and other witnesses impacted political messaging on both sides of the aisle? Jason DeSanto, a senior lecturer at Northwestern’s Pritzker School of Law, weighs in.

|
In this Nov. 4, 2019, file photo, former White House adviser on Russia, Fiona Hill arrives for a closed door meeting as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik, File)

Former National Security Council adviser Fiona Hill and U.S. diplomat David Holmes are the eighth and ninth witnesses to testify publicly before the House impeachment hearings against the 45th president. Watch live.

|
U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland listens as he testifies before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

Ambassador Gordon Sondland declared to impeachment investigators Wednesday that President Donald Trump and his lawyer Rudy Giuliani explicitly sought a “quid pro quo” with Ukraine, leveraging an Oval Office visit for political investigations of Democrats.

|
House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., left, and ranking member Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif. (AP Photo / Alex Brandon)

Ambassador Gordon Sondland, the most anticipated witness in the impeachment inquiry, will confront questions Wednesday about his evolving accounts of the Trump administration’s dealings with Ukraine. Watch live.

|
Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Mike Pence, and National Security Council aide Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman stand as they take a break in hearing before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

A career Army officer. A career foreign service official. Both had a consistent message during Day 3 of the House impeachment inquiry, and each was troubled by the phone call between President Donald Trump and the president of Ukraine. 

|
In this Oct. 11, 2019, file photo, former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, center, arrives on Capitol Hill, Friday, Oct. 11, 2019, in Washington, to testify before congressional lawmakers as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite, File)

The House will hear from a singular witness Friday in the Trump impeachment hearings: Marie Yovanovitch, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine who was targeted by the president’s allies in a “smear” campaign now central to the inquiry. Watch live.

|

Analysis of Wednesday’s public impeachment hearings from three local legal minds: Renato Mariotti, Martin Redish and Christine Svenson.

|
Top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine William Taylor, and career Foreign Service officer George Kent, left, walk back from a break as they testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, during the first public impeachment hearing of President Donald Trump’s efforts to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents. (AP Photo / Andrew Harnik)

Wednesday’s start of public impeachment hearings in Congress marked the first time that the American public could watch and listen to the witnesses whose testimony is at the core of the Democrats’ investigation.

|
The Capitol is seen as the House is set to begin public impeachment inquiry hearings as lawmakers debate whether to remove President Donald Trump from office, in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. At left is the Peace Monument. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

When the gavel strikes at the start of the House hearing on Wednesday morning, America and the rest of the world will have the chance to see and hear for themselves for the first time about President Donald Trump’s actions toward Ukraine and consider whether they are, in fact, impeachable offenses. Watch live.

|
 In this Nov. 19, 1998 file photo, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Illinois, presides over the committee’s impeachment hearing for President Bill Clinton, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo / Joe Marquette, File)

Even if the two most recent impeachment proceedings – against Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton – offer instructive clues about the path ahead, there are notable differences in the case surrounding Donald Trump. A look at then and now.

|
House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., second from right, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019. Schiff is joined by, from left, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., House Oversight and Government Reform Committee acting chair Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., House Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., and House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y. (AP Photo / Susan Walsh)

More Americans approve of the impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump than disapprove of it, though only about a third say the inquiry should be a top priority for Congress, according to a new poll.

|
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters just before the House vote on a resolution to formalize the impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump, in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

Democrats swept a rules package for their impeachment probe of President Donald Trump through a divided House on Thursday. The chamber’s vote highlighted the partisan breach the issue has only deepened.

|
Boeing Company President and CEO Dennis Muilenburg, right, is surrounded by photographers on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019, before the start of a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on “Aviation Safety and the Future of Boeing’s 737 MAX.” (AP Photo / Susan Walsh)

Lawmakers blasted Boeing and peppered its CEO on Wednesday with questions about the design and marketing of the 737 Max, the plane involved in two crashes that killed 346 people.

|
In this April 29, 2019, file pool photo Boeing Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg speaks at a news conference after company’s annual shareholders meeting at the Field Museum in Chicago. (Joshua Lott / The Washington Post via AP, Pool, File)

On the anniversary of the first of two deadly crashes involving Boeing 737 Max jets, the CEO will tell Congress that the aircraft company knows it made mistakes and is throwing everything into fixing the plane.

|
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Committee on Financial Services on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. (WTTW News)

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faced tough questions Wednesday from members of Congress about his social media platform’s digital currency project. We discuss the billionaire tech entrepreneur’s plans for Libra.

|
U.S. Rep. Mike Quigley appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Oct. 8, 2019.

A conversation with U.S. Rep. Mike Quigley on President Trump’s moves to stall the impeachment inquiry.

randomness