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The non-binding measure is being celebrated by environmental advocates, who note that Chicago is now the largest U.S. city to announce a timeline for obtaining all of its energy from renewable sources.

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A view of the Great Lakes from space. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency / Flickr)

A first-of-its-kind report shows how climate change is threatening the Great Lakes, and how their ongoing transformation figures to impact the entire region.

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(Andrew Kuhn / Flickr)

The Clean Energy Jobs Act aims to move Illinois to 100 percent renewable energy by 2050 while modernizing the state’s transportation sector and creating thousands of new jobs.

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Kimberly Wasserman, executive director of the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization, speaks during a press conference Thursday in response to a new renewable energy plan unveiled by Mayor Rahm Emanuel. (Courtesy Little Village Environmental Justice Organization)

Mayor Rahm Emanuel announces a plan for transitioning Chicago buildings to 100 percent renewable energy by 2035. But community advocates say the plan ignores existing environmental threats in some parts of the city.

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MWRD says that new primary settling tanks at its Stickney Water Reclamation Plant are lowering its carbon footprint by trapping methane emissions and generating energy that can be returned to the plant. (Courtesy Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago)

The Chicago area’s wastewater treatment agency says it is ahead of schedule in its efforts to combat climate change. 

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(Courtesy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science)

State Rep. Will Davis plans to file legislation this week that he says would expand the state’s share of renewable energy to 40 percent of total energy sources by 2030.

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(qimono / Pixabay)

The clock hands didn’t move this year, but that’s no “sign of stability,” says Rachel Bronson, president and CEO of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Instead, she calls it a “stark warning.”

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In this Nov. 6, 2018 file photo, Democratic gubernatorial candidate J.B. Pritzker speaks after he is elected over Republican incumbent Bruce Rauner. (AP Photo / Nam Y. Huh)

The move by Illinois’ new governor marks a sharp departure from his predecessor, former Gov. Bruce Rauner, who made little to no mention of the state’s role in curbing carbon emissions that most scientists agree contribute to global warming.

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A $2.5 million award to address climate change will help Chicago expand bike-share programs to all parts of the city, according to the mayor’s office.

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(Pixabay)

The mega-retailer says plans to install solar panels at nearly two dozen sites across Illinois will represent a 25-percent increase in the state’s current solar capacity.

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(Laura Marie / Flickr)

Chicago-based environmental group Openlands has received a $1 million grant to address climate change by planting new trees and recruiting residents to protect them. 

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A United Nations report warns catastrophic consequences from global warming could come as early as 2040. Local scientists share their perspectives.

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Martin Rees appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

A renowned astrophysicist explores the challenges facing Earth – and the prospect of life beyond it – in his new book “On the Future.”

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(Jeremy Atherton / Wikimedia Commons)

Local public health experts are set to testify at a Chicago hearing next week on the Trump administration’s proposal to repeal the Clean Power Plan, which established limits on pollution from power plants. 

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A new art installation at Navy Pier uses a solar-powered highway message board to warn of the dangers of climate change. (Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

Pull over to the side of the road and consider the world-ending event taking place before your eyes. That’s essentially the message conveyed by the newest piece of public art on display at Navy Pier.

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(Aurimas / Flickr)

Chicago has become the seventh city in the world to receive top-level certification for its sustainability efforts focused on green buildings.