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(Graeme Maclean / Flickr)

Illinois residents experience roughly two days each year in which the heat index surpasses 105 degrees Fahreneit. Within roughly three decades, that number could rise to 26 days per year, according to a new report.

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(Credit: Noa Vigny Billick)

Meet Dr. Mika Tosca, a scientist who traded a job at NASA’s renowned Jet Propulsion Lab to teach climate science to art and design students in Chicago.

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Near-record rainfall has left many farms and gardens underwater, but some area gardens – including our WTTW organic garden – appear to be thriving. Organic gardener Jeanne Nolan explains why.

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(Pixabay)

Public officials and environmental advocates are speaking out against the Trump administration’s rollback of an Obama-era effort to shift the U.S. away from coal-fired power plants. 

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In this July 27, 2018, file photo, the Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyoming. (AP Photo / J. David Ake, File)

The Trump administration on Wednesday completed one of its biggest rollbacks of environmental rules, replacing the landmark Obama-era Clean Power Plan with a replacement rule.

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(Meagan Davis / Wikimedia Commons)

The Illinois General Assembly has voted to repeal a decades-old law that prohibited the state from implementing its own restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions.

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As new products come on the market, traditional beef patties are being challenged by plant-based alternatives. (Engin_Akyurt / Pixabay)

There might be a new kind of meat cooking on the grill this weekend: alternative meat. But what is it? And why the craze?

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Environmental activists rallied outside Chase Tower in Chicago on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 to protest JPMorgan Chase & Company’s financing of fossil fuel projects. (Alex Ruppenthal / WTTW)

Dozens of environmental activists from across the Midwest rallied Tuesday outside Chase Tower in the Loop to protest the financing of fossil fuel projects by the country’s largest bank.

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 Students from across the Chicago area rallied in support of action to combat climate change in downtown Chicago on Friday, May 3, 2019. (Alex Ruppenthal / WTTW News)

Several hundred students ditched classes Friday for a march and rally downtown as part of the Youth Climate Strike, a global movement demanding action to address global warming.

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The non-binding measure is being celebrated by environmental advocates, who note that Chicago is now the largest U.S. city to announce a timeline for obtaining all of its energy from renewable sources.

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A view of the Great Lakes from space. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency / Flickr)

A first-of-its-kind report shows how climate change is threatening the Great Lakes, and how their ongoing transformation figures to impact the entire region.

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(Andrew Kuhn / Flickr)

The Clean Energy Jobs Act aims to move Illinois to 100 percent renewable energy by 2050 while modernizing the state’s transportation sector and creating thousands of new jobs.

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Kimberly Wasserman, executive director of the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization, speaks during a press conference Thursday in response to a new renewable energy plan unveiled by Mayor Rahm Emanuel. (Courtesy Little Village Environmental Justice Organization)

Mayor Rahm Emanuel announces a plan for transitioning Chicago buildings to 100 percent renewable energy by 2035. But community advocates say the plan ignores existing environmental threats in some parts of the city.

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MWRD says that new primary settling tanks at its Stickney Water Reclamation Plant are lowering its carbon footprint by trapping methane emissions and generating energy that can be returned to the plant. (Courtesy Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago)

The Chicago area’s wastewater treatment agency says it is ahead of schedule in its efforts to combat climate change. 

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(Courtesy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science)

State Rep. Will Davis plans to file legislation this week that he says would expand the state’s share of renewable energy to 40 percent of total energy sources by 2030.

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(qimono / Pixabay)

The clock hands didn’t move this year, but that’s no “sign of stability,” says Rachel Bronson, president and CEO of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Instead, she calls it a “stark warning.”

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