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(Alex Silets / WTTW News)

People commonly adopt dog and cats from the pound, but there’s a new phenomenon in Chicago: stray chickens and roosters are being rounded up in an effort to find them their forever homes.

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This snowy owl was bred in captivity in Canada and brought to the Illinois Raptor Center as a permanent resident. Unlike most owls, which are nocturnal, the snowy owl is active during the day. (Evan Garcia / WTTW News)

About 180 miles southwest of Chicago, a wildlife conservation facility cares for hundreds of injured, sick or orphaned raptors. We go for a look and meet some of these incredible birds of prey.

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A piping plover on Waukegan Beach in 2018. (Ethan Ellis / Flickr)

The festival had been scheduled for Aug. 23-24 at Montrose Beach, where a pair of endangered piping plovers established a nest this spring. 

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A piping plover on Waukegan Beach in 2018. (Ethan Ellis / Flickr)

Organizers of Mamby on the Beach want to move the music festival to Montrose Beach, but conservationists are pushing back because of two endangered birds living at the site. 

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A pair of sibling Magellanic chicks hatched this month at Shedd Aquarium. (Brenna Hernandez / Shedd Aquarium)

Both penguin chicks came from eggs laid by the same pair of penguins, Chile and Jr. The hatchlings are the second and third Magellanic penguins born and bred at Shedd Aquarium. 

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To monitor the development of penguin eggs, Shedd Aquarium staff use a process known as candling, which involves holding a strong light to the egg to observe inside. (Brenna Hernandez / Shedd Aquarium)

In a process known as egg candling, the aquarium’s animal care staff use a high-powered light to observe the inside of growing penguin eggs to determine whether they are fertile and monitor their development. 

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A new exhibit at the Field Museum showcases “The Birds of America,” a groundbreaking book published by painter and ornithologist John James Audubon. (Michelle Kuo / Field Museum)

The groundbreaking book “Birds of America” by painter and ornithologist John James Audubon features intricate watercolor paintings of nearly every bird on the continent. It’s now on display at the Field Museum.

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(Pexels / Pixabay)

The city’s gleaming skyline and its position along a busy migratory corridor make it the most dangerous in the U.S. for birds traveling north and south each fall and spring, a new study finds.

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Kristin Dvorak, an assistant lead bird keeper at Lincoln Park Zoo, recently traveled to South Africa as part of an international effort to rehabilitate 1,800 abandoned flamingo hatchlings. (Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

A severe drought earlier this year forced a large group of flamingos to flee a nesting site in South Africa. That’s when Lincoln Park Zoo and other wildlife conservation groups from around the world stepped in.

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Swallows huddled together during a snowstorm (Keith Williams / Flickr)

Unlike humans, birds do not have the luxury of high-powered heating systems to keep warm in the winter, but they do have a variety of unique adaptations to help them survive.

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Left: Nathan Leopold, soon after his arrest. (Chicago Daily News photo courtesy of the Chicago History Museum)

In all the attempts to dissect the Leopold and Loeb story, one mystery remains unsolved: What happened to the vast bird collection that Nathan Leopold had in his Chicago home when he went to prison?

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An Eastern meadowlark (Seri Douse / Great Backyard Bird Count)

A first-of-its-kind survey of the Chicago area’s remaining grasslands could be good news for several species of threatened birds that once thrived across Illinois.

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A male hihi bird on Tiritiri Matangi Island, New Zealand (Duncan Wright / Wikipedia)

For the second time this year, Chicago’s DryHop Brewers is joining forces with Lincoln Park Zoo in the name of wildlife conservation, this time for a rare and endangered New Zealand bird.

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(Pxhere.com)

A lawsuit filed Thursday by Illinois and seven other states challenges a Trump administration plan to eliminate long-standing protections for migratory birds.

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Once a year, scientists and veterinarians check on nesting birds at Baker’s Lake in Cook County, where they can also learn a lot about the environment – and predict possible health concerns for humans.

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(Illustration by Phillip M. Krzeminski)

A research team with a Chicago connection has uncovered new evidence about the devastating impact of the dinosaur-killing asteroid that struck Earth about 66 million years ago.

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