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Biologist Amber Wendler is among those taking part in #BlackBirdersWeek. (@amberwendler / Twitter)

The social media campaign running through Friday was founded by 30 African American scientists, birders and nature lovers as a response to the racism encountered by birder Christian Cooper in New York’s Central Park.

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Look for an American goldfinch during Saturday's Big Day birding event. (Ken Gibson / Flickr)

This weekend, people around the world will report their bird sightings as part of a massive citizen-science project. Here’s how it works.

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In this March 24, 2020 photo, provided by Conner Brown, he is seen using binoculars to look for birds in Cedar Island, Maryland. (Elizabeth Wright / Courtesy of Conner Brown via AP)

With coronavirus restrictions dragging on, interest in bird-watching has soared as bored Americans notice a fascinating world just outside their windows. 

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Geese are more relaxed this spring with fewer humans around, researchers say. (Jocelyn Piirainen / Flickr)

With fewer humans out and about during the coronavirus pandemic, Canada geese are more relaxed during this spring’s nesting season, according to researchers at Ball State University. 

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(Monty and Rose / Facebook)

Remember those endangered piping plovers that captured Chicagoans’ hearts? They’re back — as the stars of the documentary “Monty and Rose,” screening this month during the One Earth Film Festival.

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 In this Dec. 19, 2008, file photo, Jeannie Elias, left, Mary Spencer, and Alison Wagner look for birds in Fayston, Vermont, as they take part in The National Audubon Society’s annual Christmas Bird Count. (AP Photo / Toby Talbot, File)

It’s been 120 years since New York ornithologist Frank Chapman launched his Christmas Bird Count as a bold new alternative to what had been a longtime Christmas tradition of hunting birds.

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A piping plover (Lorraine Minns / Audubon Photography Awards)

Hundreds of bird species in North America are at risk of extinction from climate change, according to an alarming new report from the National Audubon Society.

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This April 14, 2019 file photo shows a western meadowlark in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colorado. (AP Photo / David Zalubowski, File)

North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970, a comprehensive study shows.

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(Alex Silets / WTTW News)

People commonly adopt dog and cats from the pound, but there’s a new phenomenon in Chicago: stray chickens and roosters are being rounded up in an effort to find them their forever homes.

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This snowy owl was bred in captivity in Canada and brought to the Illinois Raptor Center as a permanent resident. Unlike most owls, which are nocturnal, the snowy owl is active during the day. (Evan Garcia / WTTW News)

About 180 miles southwest of Chicago, a wildlife conservation facility cares for hundreds of injured, sick or orphaned raptors. We go for a look and meet some of these incredible birds of prey.

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A piping plover on Waukegan Beach in 2018. (Ethan Ellis / Flickr)

The festival had been scheduled for Aug. 23-24 at Montrose Beach, where a pair of endangered piping plovers established a nest this spring. 

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A piping plover on Waukegan Beach in 2018. (Ethan Ellis / Flickr)

Organizers of Mamby on the Beach want to move the music festival to Montrose Beach, but conservationists are pushing back because of two endangered birds living at the site. 

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A pair of sibling Magellanic chicks hatched this month at Shedd Aquarium. (Brenna Hernandez / Shedd Aquarium)

Both penguin chicks came from eggs laid by the same pair of penguins, Chile and Jr. The hatchlings are the second and third Magellanic penguins born and bred at Shedd Aquarium. 

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To monitor the development of penguin eggs, Shedd Aquarium staff use a process known as candling, which involves holding a strong light to the egg to observe inside. (Brenna Hernandez / Shedd Aquarium)

In a process known as egg candling, the aquarium’s animal care staff use a high-powered light to observe the inside of growing penguin eggs to determine whether they are fertile and monitor their development. 

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A new exhibit at the Field Museum showcases “The Birds of America,” a groundbreaking book published by painter and ornithologist John James Audubon. (Michelle Kuo / Field Museum)

The groundbreaking book “Birds of America” by painter and ornithologist John James Audubon features intricate watercolor paintings of nearly every bird on the continent. It’s now on display at the Field Museum.

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(Pexels / Pixabay)

The city’s gleaming skyline and its position along a busy migratory corridor make it the most dangerous in the U.S. for birds traveling north and south each fall and spring, a new study finds.

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