Thanks to our sponsors:

View all sponsors

|
A Fowler’s toad (Courtesy Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum)

By tracking the types, frequency and intensity of frog mating calls, experts hope to gauge the success of conservation efforts in an area commonly referred to as the city’s dumping ground. 

|
A North American river otter born in February at Brookfield Zoo had to be euthanized after his health declined. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

Staff made the decision to euthanize the North American river otter pup after his health declined over the weekend. “This was an enormously hard decision to make,” said Bill Zeigler of the Chicago Zoological Society.

|
Conservation advocates worry that proposed legislation in Illinois could make it harder to protect vulnerable populations of monarch butterflies, which face a number of threats in the state. (Patrick Williams / Openlands)

A pair of bills would strip the state of its authority to regulate endangered species that are protected at the federal level but that might require further protections within Illinois.

|
A North American river otter born in February at Brookfield Zoo will be relocated to a zoo with otters of a similar age. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

Staff at the zoo are caring for the pup because his mother was unable to provide him with proper nourishment. His arrival in February marked the zoo’s second successful birth for this once-endangered species.

|
Scales in spades: See more than 200 species this weekend at ReptileFest. (Pexels / Pixabay)

We get up close and personal with some cold-blooded creatures ahead of the nation’s largest educational reptile show.

|
 “Dreamcatcher” (2000), © Thomas D. Mangelsen

A world-renowned nature photographer visits Chicago for the opening of an exhibition of his truly magnificent wildlife pictures at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum.

|

Sometimes the best thing for a forest or prairie is to burn it. We spend a day with a Cook County burn crew.  

|
(Courtesy of Neil Shubin)

Renowned University of Chicago paleontologist Neil Shubin recently returned from an expedition to search for fossils in Antarctica. He tells us about his trip.

|
(Pexels / Pixabay)

The city’s gleaming skyline and its position along a busy migratory corridor make it the most dangerous in the U.S. for birds traveling north and south each fall and spring, a new study finds.

|
Lincoln Park Zoo’s new Searle Visitor Center (Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

The zoo is no longer offering a program that allowed visitors to touch or interact with a handful of different animals, citing research showing that some animals display signs of stress after being handled by humans. 

|
Kapuki, a 13-year-old female eastern black rhinoceros at Lincoln Park Zoo (Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

Kapuki, a 13-year-old eastern black rhinoceros, is expected to give birth to a baby calf in May. 

|
(U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III)

Each year, Chicago Animal Care and Control takes in more than 3,000 stray dogs and 3,000 stray cats on average, but only a fraction of them are reunited with their owners. How a new app could help link lost pets with their owners.

|
Chicago Animal Care and Control Executive Director Kelley Gandurski poses for a picture with Ashley, a 6-year-old stray dog available for adoption. (Alex Ruppenthal / WTTW)

Chicago Animal Care and Control was so packed with cats late last summer that it sent out an urgent call for adoptions. Now, the department seems to have found a solution to one of its biggest challenges: overcrowding.

|
A chimpanzee in the Goualougo Triangle, part of the Nouabale-Ndoki National Park in the Republic of Congo. (Kyle de Nobrega / Wildlife Conservation Society)

The complex and relatively advanced cultures of chimpanzees are disappearing as human beings encroach on previously undisturbed areas of African forest, according to a new study involving researchers from Lincoln Park Zoo.

|
Kristin Dvorak, an assistant lead bird keeper at Lincoln Park Zoo, recently traveled to South Africa as part of an international effort to rehabilitate 1,800 abandoned flamingo hatchlings. (Courtesy Lincoln Park Zoo)

A severe drought earlier this year forced a large group of flamingos to flee a nesting site in South Africa. That’s when Lincoln Park Zoo and other wildlife conservation groups from around the world stepped in.

|
The century plant at Garfield Park Conservatory stands about 17 feet, 6 inches tall on Monday, March 4, 2019.

For more than half a century, a plant at the Garfield Park Conservatory has been growing slowly and imperceptibly. Until last fall. We visit the rapidly ascending century plant.

randomness