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Adler goes for a walk. (Courtesy of PAWS Chicago)

Animal shelters are offering innovative ways to adopt pets during the statewide stay-at-home order. We reach out to two Chicago shelters to find out how the pandemic is changing their operations – but not their missions.

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Spring is coming through with signs of life and hope. (Patty Wetli / WTTW)

Snowdrop, crocus, hyacinth and other early spring bloomers are cheering up the gloomy landscape.

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Lucy (left) and Charger, two California sea lions, received shamrock-shaped treats on St. Patrick’s Day at Brookfield Zoo. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

At least one St. Patrick’s Day tradition is alive and well in these topsy-turvy times. Animals at Brookfield Zoo received special shamrock-shaped treats on Tuesday.

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Arashiyama Bamboo Forest, Japan (Daniel Peckham / Flickr)

Concerns over the spread of the coronavirus have a lot of people working from home, schools closed, restaurants shuttered and sports canceled. Can we even go outside? Yes, say the experts, but still practice social distance.

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The spotted lanternfly threatens grape, apple, pear, cherry and hop plants and trees, among others. (Chesapeake Bay Program / Flickr)

The spotted lanternfly, oak wilt, gypsy moth and boxwood blight are among the latest threats in the plant world. And citizen scientists have a role to play when it comes to stopping the next plague.

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(Photo by Tim Laman)

For the past 25 years, Cheryl Knott and her husband Tim Laman have dedicated their lives to the orangutans that live in Borneo’s Gunung Palung National Park. On Tuesday, they’ll highlight the great ape’s plight with a talk.

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(Normanack / Flickr)

A family friendly expo Saturday offers workshops, a resource fair and more for those curious about raising livestock in the city.

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Charger the sea lion cozies up to a Valentine’s Day cake. (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

From gorillas chomping on heart-shaped biscuits to sea lions digging into a gelatin cake, Brookfield Zoo’s Valentine’s Day celebration has warmed our hearts.

            

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Pangolins (USAid Asia / Flickr)

Preliminary findings point to the endangered pangolin as a possible host of the novel coronavirus, sparking concerns that a panic could lead to killings of the animal. 

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In this Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020, photo, scientist and study director Jennifer Molignano notates the time she begins dosing living human skin tissues with two types of commercially available skin care products during a demonstration of experiments at a MatTek Corporation lab, in Ashland, Massachusetts. (AP Photo / Steven Senne)

California, Nevada and Illinois all saw new laws take effect this year that ban the sale or import of animal-tested cosmetics. 

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A model of a giant squid in Glover’s Harbour, Newfoundland. (Robert Hiscock / Flickr)

Biologist Carrie Albertin helped sequence the genome of the octopus while earning her Ph.D. at the University of Chicago. Now she’s made surprising discoveries about the elusive giant squid.

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(Moshe Harosh / Pixabay)

CBD pet products claim to treat pain, anxiety and even seizures, but do they work? And are they even safe? The chief veterinary officer of the American Veterinary Medical Association weighs in.

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An illustration of Tiktaalik by Flick Ford. (Courtesy of the University of Chicago)

Sixteen years after making a key discovery with two colleagues, University of Chicago paleontologist Neil Shubin and others are deepening their understanding of an extraordinary, ancient fish.

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(Jo ana Kubiak / Lurie Garden)

Lurie Garden's four-season approach to plantings provides a prime example of the beauty and life to be found in a winter garden.

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In this Sept. 20, 2017, file photo, Oscar the cat, who is not a service animal, sits in his carry on travel bag after arriving at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix. (AP Photo / Ross D. Franklin, File)

The days of passengers bringing rabbits, turtles and birds on planes as emotional-support animals could be ending.

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(Pexels / Pixabay)

Marijuana may produce pleasurable affects in people, but for pets, the mind-altering substance can be dangerous and even lethal, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. “We don’t want people to think it’s benign or harmless,” said Michael San Filippo of the AVMA.