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(Courtesy of McDonald’s)

After years of pressure from public health advocates, the Chicago-based burger chain announces a plan to reduce the use of antibiotics in its beef products.

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Emerald, age 3, is among the dogs and cats available for adoption at Chicago Animal Care and Control. (Courtesy Chicago Animal Care and Control)

With its building “full to the brim” with cats and dogs, Chicago’s municipal-run animal shelter is waiving adoption fees for those looking to bring home a new pet this holiday season.

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A photograph of a shelter dog from our story, “Photographer Donates His Talents to Help Dogs Get Adopted.” (Courtesy Josh Feeney)

Fix Chicago 2019 aims to end the killing of shelter pets in Chicago. The first task of the new group? Taking inventory of where candidates running for city office stand on various animal welfare issues. 

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(Anthony Albright / Flickr)

Medical professionals and public health advocates in Illinois are calling on lawmakers to pass legislation to curb limiting what they say is a “reckless overuse” of antibiotics in meat-producing animals.

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(Courtesy Landmark Pest Management)

Chicago’s recent designation as the country’s “rat capital” can be attributed in large part, a new study finds, to a particular type of home: rental units. 

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Chicago Animal Care and Control, 2741 S. Western Ave. (Alex Ruppenthal / Chicago Tonight)

The renovated medical and surgery areas at Chicago Animal Care and Control will replace the shelter’s existing medical unit, which is more than 20 years old. 

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(Karamo / Pixabay)

Lawmakers are set to consider legislation this week that would limit the use of antibiotics in food-producing animals, a practice that has been shown to fuel drug-resistant bacteria that can be dangerous to humans.

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A green-winged macaw being trained prior to its release in the Iberá Park in Corrientes, Argentina (Beth Wald / Lincoln Park Zoo)

Conservationists from around the world are gathering this week to focus on saving threatened species and reintroducing them into the wild.

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An Eastern meadowlark (Seri Douse / Great Backyard Bird Count)

A first-of-its-kind survey of the Chicago area’s remaining grasslands could be good news for several species of threatened birds that once thrived across Illinois.

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A male hihi bird on Tiritiri Matangi Island, New Zealand (Duncan Wright / Wikipedia)

For the second time this year, Chicago’s DryHop Brewers is joining forces with Lincoln Park Zoo in the name of wildlife conservation, this time for a rare and endangered New Zealand bird.

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A group of Mexican wolves at Brookfield Zoo (Jim Schulz / Chicago Zoological Society)

They are one of the most successful packs within the nationwide Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, but nine of the 10 wolves will leave Chicago for new homes as part of a plan to help save the endangered species.

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The Bulb Garden at the Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe. (Courtesy Chicago Botanic Garden)

Sunny days and cool nights have helped produce a vivid display of fall colors this season. At the Chicago Botanic Garden, thousands of trees are at their peak.

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U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Feb. 21, 2018.

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin is calling for federal action following a report that identified an Illinois meat-processing plant as the worst-polluting plant of its type in the country.

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Layla, an eastern black rhinoceros at Brookfield Zoo (Courtesy Chicago Zoological Society)

The 2,300-pound rhinoceros, Layla, logged an important milestone this week, celebrating her eighth birthday just months after overcoming a near-deadly infection.

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A beef-processing plant (istanbulimage / iStock)

A pork-processing plant in western Illinois released an average of nearly 2,000 pounds of harmful nitrogen per day into a tributary of the Illinois River last year, according to a new report.

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(Photo credit: Josh Feeney)

More than 6,000 dogs were taken in by the city’s animal shelter last year. How one local animal lover is focusing his lens on the challenge of finding them permanent homes.

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