Stories by Associated Press

Lifetime to Follow Up on ‘Surviving R. Kelly’ Docu-Series

In this June 26, 2019, file photo, R&B singer R. Kelly, center, arrives at the Leighton Criminal Court building for an arraignment on sex-related felonies in Chicago. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky, File)

The network announced Tuesday that it has ordered “Surviving R. Kelly: The Aftermath,” a four-part series that includes interviews with new survivors and experts on the case.

NCAA Punishes DePaul for Basketball Recruiting Violation

In this Feb. 9, 2019, file photo, DePaul head coach Dave Leitao reacts during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo / John Minchillo, File)

The NCAA suspended DePaul men’s basketball coach Dave Leitao for the first three games of the regular season Tuesday, saying he should have done more to prevent recruiting violations by his staff.

Hundreds of Black Deaths in 1919 Are Being Remembered

In this 1919 photo provided by Chicago History Museum, a crowd of men and armed National Guard stand in front of the Ogden Cafe during race riots in Chicago. (Chicago History Museum / The Jun Fujita negatives collection via AP)

America in the summer of 1919 ran red with blood from racial violence, and yet today, 100 years later, not many people know it even happened. It was branded “Red Summer” because of the bloodshed and amounted to some of the worst white-on-black violence in U.S. history.

Retired Justice John Paul Stevens to be Laid to Rest Tuesday

Honor guards salute as they execute the changing of the guard in the Great Hall of the U.S. Supreme Court where the late Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens is laying in repose, Monday, July 22, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo / Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The 99-year-old former Supreme Court justice died last week in Florida. He served on the high court for nearly 35 years, retiring in 2010.

White Sox Host 1st MLB Game with Foul Pole-to-Pole Netting

Security personnel at Guaranteed Rate Field are viewed through the newly extended protective netting along left field before a baseball game between the Miami Marlins and the Chicago White Sox, Monday, July 22, 2019, in Chicago. (AP Photo / Charles Rex Arbogast)

The new netting in Chicago will be 30 feet high above the dugouts and reach a maximum height of 45 feet down the lines.

Nation Marks 50 Years After Apollo 11’s ‘Giant Leap’ on Moon

In this July 20, 1969 photo made available by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity. (Neil Armstrong / NASA via AP)

A moonstruck nation celebrated the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s “giant leap” by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin at parties, races, ball games and concerts Saturday, toasting with Tang and gobbling MoonPies.

Chicago’s Elusive Gator Settles into New Home in Florida

Florida alligator expert Frank Robb holds an alligator during a news conference, Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Amr Alfiky)

The 4-foot, 18-pound American alligator will stay alone for 90 days to make sure he is illness-free, and then join other gators, says St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park Director John Brueggen.

Heat Wave Forecast Prompts Chicago Public Housing Checks

A roofer works on a new home under construction Thursday, July 18, 2019, in Houston. A heat wave is expected to send temperatures soaring close to 100 degrees through the weekend across much of the country. (AP Photo / David J. Phillip)

Public housing officials in Chicago were planning well-being checks on residents as the heat and humidity are expected to mount to dangerous levels.

Police Board Fires 4 Officers in Laquan McDonald-Related Case

A still image from police dashcam footage that captured the shooting of Laquan McDonald, center, on a Southwest Side street in 2014.

The Chicago Police Board on Thursday fired four police officers for allegedly covering up a white officer’s 2014 fatal shooting of black teenager Laquan McDonald.

Number of US Overdose Deaths Appears to be Falling

In this April 5, 2019, file photo, containers depicting OxyContin prescription pill bottles lie on the ground in front of the Department of Health and Human Services’ headquarters in Washington as protesters demonstrate against the FDA’s opioid prescription drug approval practices. (AP Photo / Patrick Semansky, File)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday posted data showing nearly 68,000 drug overdose deaths were reported last year. Overdose deaths had been climbing each year since 1990, topping 70,000 in 2017.

US Heat Wave Just Warming Up for Long and Scorching Weekend

Russ Wilson splashes water on his face from a fountain in New York, Wednesday, July 17, 2019. The heat wave that has been roasting much of the U.S. in recent days is just getting warmed up, with temperatures expected to soar to dangerous levels through the weekend. (AP Photo / Seth Wenig)

More than 100 local heat records are expected to fall Saturday, according to the National Weather Service. Most won’t be record-daily highs but record-high nighttime lows, and that lack of cooling can be dangerous, meteorologists say. 

Myths and Risks in App That Gives You a Peek Into Older Self

FaceApp is displayed on an iPhone Wednesday, July 17, 2019, in New York. The popular app is under fire for privacy concerns. (AP Photo / Jenny Kane)

Is a peek into the future worth your privacy in the present? That concern was pushed to the spotlight this week with the resurgence of a smartphone app that uses artificial intelligence to transform your current face into your younger and older selves.

John Paul Stevens Emerged as Supreme Court’s Leading Liberal

In this April 30, 2014 file photo, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens prepares to testify on the ever-increasing amount of money spent on elections as he appears before the Senate Rules Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo, File)

John Paul Stevens moved left as the Supreme Court shifted to the right during his nearly 35 years as a justice. That’s how the bow-tie wearing Republican from the Midwest emerged as the leader of the high court’s liberal wing.

Apple, Google Continue Inclusive Push with New Emoji

These images provided by Apple shows new emoji released by Apple. (Apple via AP)

Apple and Google are rolling out dozens of new emoji that of course include cute critters, but also expand the number of images of human diversity.

Despite Grounding of Boeing Plane, United 2Q Profit Rises

In this Jan. 23, 2019, photo employees walk up a ramp toward a ramp where a United Airlines jet is parked at a gate Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, New Jersey. (AP Photo / Julio Cortez)

United said Tuesday that its second-quarter profit soared 54%, to $1.05 billion. The results beat expectations, and United slightly raised its forecast of full-year profit.

Former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens Dies at 99

In this May 20, 2013 file photo, retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens talks about his views and career during a forum at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston. (AP Photo / Michael Dwyer, File)

John Paul Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court’s leading liberal, died Tuesday in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after suffering a stroke Monday.

Florida Expert Captures Elusive Alligator at Humboldt Park Lagoon

The Humboldt Park alligator was caught early Tuesday, July 16, 2019. (Courtesy of Chicago Animal Care and Control)

The alligator had a good run as day after day the people hunting for him in a Chicago lagoon came up empty, but in the end he was no match for an expert the city shipped in from Florida.

Man Whose Family Died in Boeing 737 Max Crash: Scrap the Jet

In this April 29, 2019, file photo, Paul Njoroge, who lost his wife and three young children in the March 10 crash of an Ethiopian Airlines’ Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, speaks at a news conference in Chicago. (AP Photo / Teresa Crawford, File)

A man who lost his wife, mother-in-law and three young children in the crash of a 737 Max in Ethiopia says Boeing should scrap the plane and top executives should resign and face criminal charges.

Here’s a Fact: We Went to the Moon in 1969

This July 21, 1969 photo made available by NASA shows the U.S. flag planted at Tranquility Base on the surface of the moon, and a silhouette of a thruster at right, seen from a window in the Lunar Module. (NASA via AP)

Fifty years after Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon, some people insist it never happened and was all a big hoax by the U.S. government. Here’s a look at some of the most common claims and how they're explained away.

Florida Expert Flies to Chicago to Help Catch Alligator

Half of Humboldt Park closes as search enters second week

An alligator floats in the Humboldt Park Lagoon on Tuesday, July 9, 2019, in Chicago. Officials couldn’t say how the creature got there, but traps are being placed around the lagoon in hopes the animal will swim into one and be safely removed. (Armando L. Sanchez / Chicago Tribune via AP)

Sections of Humboldt Park are closed Monday while the search continues for the elusive gator, which is at least 4 feet long. 

Judges to Decide on Bond Hearings for R. Kelly Indictments

In this June 6, 2019 file photo, musician R. Kelly departs the Leighton Criminal Court building after pleading not guilty to 11 additional sex-related charges in Chicago. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky, File)

A federal court hearing for R&B singer R. Kelly has been pushed back a day and will instead be held Tuesday when the singer was expected to be arraigned.

A Healthy Lifestyle May Offset Genetic Risk for Alzheimer’s

In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. (AP Photo / Francisco Seco, File)

People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more likely to develop dementia versus those with low genetic risk and good habits, researchers reported Sunday. 

Churches Jump Into Action With Threat of Immigration Sweeps

Thousands of people, including immigrants and their supporters, rally against President Donald Trump’s immigration policies as they march from Daley Plaza to the Chicago field office of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Saturday, July 13, 2019, in Chicago. (Abel Uribe / Chicago Tribune via AP)

As a nationwide immigration crackdown loomed, religious leaders across the country used their pulpits Sunday to quell concerns in immigrant communities.

R. Kelly Facing Sweeping New Federal Sex Crime Charges

In this June 26, 2019, file photo, R&B singer R. Kelly, center, arrives at the Leighton Criminal Court building for an arraignment on sex-related felonies in Chicago. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky, File)

Singer R. Kelly, already facing sexual abuse charges brought by Illinois prosecutors, was arrested in Chicago on a federal grand jury indictment listing 13 counts including sex crimes and obstruction of justice.

Trump Abandons Bid to Include Citizenship Question on Census

This March 23, 2018, file photo shows an envelope containing a 2018 census letter mailed to a U.S. resident as part of the nation’s only test run of the 2020 Census. Legal wrangling has surrounded the U.S. census count for decades, culminating in this year’s fight over adding a citizenship question. (AP Photo / Michelle R. Smith, File)

President Donald Trump abandoned his controversial bid to demand citizenship details from all respondents in next year’s census Thursday, instead directing federal agencies to try to compile the information using existing databases.