Stories by Associated Press

Steel Mill Sorry for Spill That Killed Fish, Closed Beaches

 In this Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019 photo, a dead catfish floats along the bank of the Burns Ditch near the Portage Marina in Portage, Indiana. Some beaches along northwestern Indiana’s Lake Michigan shoreline are closed after authorities say a chemical spill in a tributary caused a fish kill. (John Luke / The Times via AP)

A steel company apologized for a spill of cyanide and ammonia that led to a fish kill and prompted the closure of beaches along Lake Michigan, saying it “accepts responsibility for the incident.”

Scientists Confirm July Set New Global Heat Record

In this file photo dated Thursday, July 25, 2019, a bird sits on a straw bale on a field in Frankfurt, Germany, as the sun rises during an ongoing heatwave in Europe. (AP Photo / Michael Probst, FILE)

July was the hottest month measured on Earth since records began in 1880, the latest in a long line of peaks that scientists say backs up predictions for man-made climate change.

Government Wants a New 911-Like Number Just for Suicide Hotline

In this Sunday, Aug. 11, 2019, photo, a man uses a cell phone in New Orleans. With suicides on the rise, the government wants to make the national crisis hotline easier to reach. (AP Photo / Jenny Kane)

With suicides on the rise, the U.S. government wants to make the national crisis hotline easier to reach. Once implemented, people will just need to dial 988 to seek help. 

AP Sources: Trump Has Talked About Buying Greenland for US

This July 11, 2015 file photo shows a general view of the town of Upernavik in western Greenland. (Linda Kastrup / Ritzau Scanpix via AP)

Aiming to put his mark on the world map, President Donald Trump has talked to aides and allies about buying Greenland for the U.S.

Flooding, A Trade War and Deere Cuts Outlook Again

In this Feb. 23, 2018 file photo, John Deere products, including a toy tractor on the sign, are on display at a home and garden trade show in Council Bluffs, Iowa. (AP Photo / Nati Harnik, File)

Deere & Co. cut its profit expectations for the second time this year as beleaguered farmers and an escalating trade war with China cut into sales.

Doctors Suspect Vaping Behind Dozens of Lung Illnesses in US

In this Monday, July 29, 2019 photo, Dylan Nelson, of Burlington, Wisconsin, and his sister, Andrea, sit for an interview. He was rushed to the hospital in June by his sister last month with severe breathing problems. Doctors believe he and about two dozen other young adults suffered serious lung injuries after vaping nicotine or THC, or both. (Rick Wood / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel via AP)

As many as 50 people in at least six states have come down with breathing illnesses that may be linked to e-cigarettes or other vaping products.

US Stock Indexes End Mostly Higher After Volatile Day

Specialist Thomas Schreck, left, and trader Patrick Casey, center, work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Stocks are rising on Wall Street early Thursday on indications American consumers continue to spend and embrace online shopping. (AP Photo / Richard Drew)

Investors rode out another turbulent day on Wall Street that kept stock indexes flipping between gains and losses until a late-day bounce gave the market a modest gain. Local analysts weigh in on what it all means for consumers.

US Makes New Push for Graphic Warning Labels on Cigarettes

(Gerd Altmann / Pixabay)

The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday proposed 13 new warnings that would appear on all cigarettes, including images of cancerous neck tumors, diseased lungs and feet with amputated toes.

Vaping Companies Sue to Delay US Review of E-Cigarettes

In this Tuesday, April 10, 2018 photo, a high school principal displays vaping devices that were confiscated from students at the school in Massachusetts. (AP Photo / Steven Senne)

The legal challenge by the Vapor Technology Association is the latest hurdle in the Food and Drug Administration’s yearslong effort to regulate the multibillion-dollar vaping industry, which includes makers and retailers of e-cigarette devices and flavored solutions.

Experts Call for Steps to Stem Increases in Legionnaires’ Disease

This 1978 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows Legionella pneumophila bacteria, which are responsible for causing the pneumonic disease Legionnaires’ disease. (Francis Chandler / CDC via AP)

In a report released Wednesday, top U.S. science experts said annual cases of Legionnaires’ disease jumped more than fivefold from 2000 to 2017, and that as many as 70,000 Americans get the disease every year.

Stocks Slide After Bond Market Warns Again of Recession

In this Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, file photo trader Andrew Silverman works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

Weak economic data around the world also unnerved investors, who flipped back into selling mode after driving a rally Tuesday on hopeful signals that the U.S.-China trade war may not be worsening so much.

United Tells Pilots No Alcohol for 12 Hours Before Flights

 In this June 26, 2019, file photo United Airlines jetliners pass each other at Denver International Airport. (AP Photo / David Zalubowski, File)

The change in the rule — it’s called “bottle-to-throttle” in the airline business — comes several days after two United pilots were arrested in Scotland and charged with suspicion of being under the influence before a flight to the U.S.

The Plight of the Monarchs: Trump Order Weakens Protections

Monarchs are in trouble, despite efforts by volunteers and organizations across the United States to nurture the beloved butterfly. And the Trump administration’s new order weakening the Endangered Species Act could well make things worse.

US Delays Tariffs on Some Chinese Goods, Drops Others

  In this March 6, 2019, file photo a staff member works on a mobile phone production line during a media tour in Huawei factory in Dongguan, China’s Guangdong province. Huawei Technologies Co. is one of the world’s biggest supplier of telecommunications equipment. (AP Photo / Kin Cheung, File)

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative says it would delay the tariffs to Dec. 15 on some goods, including cellphones, laptop computers, video game consoles, some toys, computer monitors, shoes and clothing.

US Government Weakens Application of Endangered Species Act

In this Feb. 1, 2016 file photo, a bald eagle takes flight at the Museum of the Shenandaoh Valley in Winchester, Virginia.  (Scott Mason / The Winchester Star via AP, File)

Under the enforcement changes, officials for the first time will be able to publicly attach a cost to saving an animal or plant. Blanket protections for creatures newly listed as threatened will be removed. 

New Rules to Deny Green Cards to Many Legal Immigrants

Acting Director of United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Ken Cuccinelli, speaks during a briefing at the White House, Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

The Trump administration announced Monday it is moving forward with one of its most aggressive steps yet to restrict legal immigration: Denying green cards to many migrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance.

Study: Asian Carp Could Find Plenty of Food in Lake Michigan

In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. (AP Photo / John Flesher, File)

“Our study indicates that the carp can survive and grow in much larger areas of the lake than previous studies suggested,” said Peter Alsip, lead author of the paper.

Gun-Control Backers Concerned About Changing Federal Courts

In this Jan. 13, 2014 file photo, former California State Sen. Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, displays a homemade fully automatic rifle, confiscated by the Department of Justice, at the Capitol in Sacramento, California. (AP Photo / Rich Pedroncelli, File)

A federal judiciary that is becoming increasingly conservative under President Donald Trump and the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate has gun control advocates on edge. 

Trump Says He Wants Background Checks, Also Reassures NRA

President Donald Trump talks to reporters on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, Aug. 9, 2019, in Washington, as he prepares to leave Washington for his annual August holiday at his New Jersey golf club.  (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump said Friday he believes he has influence to rally Republicans around stronger federal background check laws as Congress and the White House work on a response to last weekend’s mass shootings in Texas and Ohio.

White Sox, Yankees to Play at ‘Field of Dreams’ in 2020

In this July 22, 1977, file photo, people portraying ghost players emerge from a cornfield as they reenact a scene from the movie “Field of Dreams” at the movie site in Dyersville, Iowa.  (AP Photo / Charlie Neibergall, File)

Major League Baseball announced Thursday that the White Sox will play host to the Yankees in Dyersville, Iowa, on Aug. 13, 2020.

Fox: Jussie Smollett Gone from ‘Empire,’ Character Lives On

In this May 20, 2016 file photo, actor and singer Jussie Smollett attends the “Empire” FYC Event in Los Angeles. (Richard Shotwell / Invision / AP, File)

“You’ll see pictures of him in the background,” Fox Entertainment CEO Charlie Collier said, without elaborating. He promised “surprises at the beginning of the season that you’re going to love.”

2 Senators Ask MLB For Data on Foul Ball Injuries

In this July 6, 2015 file photo, a fan is helped after being hit by a foul ball during the ninth inning of a baseball game between the Milwaukee Brewers and the Atlanta Braves in Milwaukee. (AP Photo / Morry Gash, File)

Illinois’ two senators continued their pressure campaign on Major League Baseball to be more proactive about fan safety at ballparks, urging greater transparency about how often and how seriously fans are hurt by foul balls.

Federal Charges Ramp Up Pressure on R. Kelly to Make Deal

In this June 6, 2019 file photo, singer R. Kelly appears at a court hearing before Judge Lawrence Flood in Chicago. (E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune via AP, Pool)

The 40 counts R. Kelly faces carry a combined maximum prison sentence of more than 500 years, meaning the R&B star could spend the rest of his life behind bars if he loses badly at trial. 

Chicago Police Find Drugs, Guns and Alligator in Raid

The discovery comes about a month after an alligator in the Humboldt Park Lagoon captured the attention of the city for about a week before the alligator was captured by a gator hunter who was flown in from Florida.

Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison Dead at 88

In this Nov. 25, 2005 file photo, author Toni Morrison listens to Mexico’s Carlos Monsivais during the Julio Cortazar professorship conference at the Guadalajara’s University in Guadalajara City, Mexico.  (AP Photo / Guillermo Arias, File)

Publisher Alfred A. Knopf says Nobel laureate Toni Morrison died Monday night at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. She was 88.