Stories by associated press

Trump Calls for GOP Unity, Repeats Lies About Election Loss

Former President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) Sunday, Feb. 28, 2021, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo / John Raoux)

Taking the stage for the first time since leaving office, former President Donald Trump on Sunday called for Republican Party unity, even as he exacerbated intraparty divisions and trumpeted lies about the election in a speech that made clear he intends to remain a dominant political force.

Fraud Overwhelms Pandemic-Related Unemployment Programs

A man walks past a “Now Hiring” sign on a window at Sherwin Williams store, Friday, Feb. 26, 2021, in Woodmere Village, Ohio. (AP Photo / Tony Dejak)

With the floodgates set to open on another round of unemployment aid, states are being hammered with a new wave of fraud as they scramble to update security systems and block scammers who already have siphoned billions of dollars from pandemic-related jobless programs.

What’s in an Adjective? ‘Democrat Party’ Label on the Rise

In this Feb. 24, 2021, file photo, a sign directs Republican and Democrat legislators to their parking areas as a N.H. State Trooper watches the flow of traffic prior to a New Hampshire House of Representatives session held at NH Sportsplex, due to the coronavirus in Bedford, N.H. (AP Photo / Charles Krupa, File)

Amid bipartisan calls to dial back extreme partisanship following the insurrection, the intentional misuse of “Democrat” as an adjective remains in nearly universal use among Republicans. Propelled by conservative media, it also has caught on with far-right elements that were energized by the Trump presidency.

J&J’s 1-Dose Shot Cleared, Giving US 3rd COVID-19 Vaccine

This September 2020, file photo provided by Johnson & Johnson shows a pharmacist preparing to give an experimental COVID-19 vaccine. (Johnson & Johnson via AP, File)

The U.S. is getting a third vaccine to prevent COVID-19, as the Food and Drug Administration on Saturday cleared a Johnson & Johnson shot that works with just one dose instead of two.

Judge Approves $650M Facebook Privacy Lawsuit Settlement

This March 29, 2018 file photo shows the Facebook logo on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York’s Times Square. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, File)

A federal judge on Friday approved a $650 million settlement of a privacy lawsuit against Facebook for allegedly using photo face-tagging and other biometric data without the permission of its users.

House Passes $1.9T Pandemic Bill on Near Party-Line Vote

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., meets with reporters before the House votes to pass a $1.9 trillion pandemic relief package, during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, Feb. 26, 2021. Pelosi is flanked by Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., left, and Rep. Pete Aguilar, D-Calif. (AP Photo / J. Scott Applewhite)

The House approved a $1.9 trillion pandemic relief bill in a win for President Joe Biden, even as top Democrats tried assuring agitated progressives that they’d revive their derailed drive to boost the minimum wage.

Highlights of the COVID-19 Relief Bill Advancing in Congress

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks during a news conference at the Capitol, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo / Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The House passed a $1.9 trillion pandemic relief package early Saturday, 219-212, that includes $1,400 checks for most Americans and billions of dollars for schools, state and local governments and businesses.

US Advisers Endorse Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine from J&J

This September 2020, file photo provided by Johnson & Johnson shows a pharmacist preparing to give an experimental COVID-19 vaccine. (Johnson & Johnson via AP, File)

U.S. health advisers endorsed a one-dose COVID-19 vaccine from Johnson & Johnson on Friday, putting the nation on the cusp of adding an easier-to-use option to fight the pandemic.

United Will Pay $49 Million to Settle Air Mail Fraud Case

In this Oct. 14, 2020 file photo, United Airlines employees work at ticket counters in Terminal 1 at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. (AP Photo / Nam Y. Huh, File)

United Airlines will pay more than $49 million to avoid criminal prosecution and settle civil charges of defrauding the U.S. Postal Service in the delivery of international mail. 

Biden Lifts Trump-Era Ban Blocking Legal Immigration to US

President Joe Biden closes the folder after signing an executive order relating to U.S. supply chains, in the State Dining Room of the White House, Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

President Joe Biden on Wednesday lifted a freeze on green cards issued by his predecessor during the pandemic that lawyers said was blocking most legal immigration to the United States.

Another Wave of Fans Returning to Sports Despite COVID-19

Fans cheer the New York Knicks coming out to warm up for an NBA basketball game against the Golden State Warriors on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2021, in New York. A limited number of fans were allowed to attend. (Wendell Cruz / Pool Photo via AP)

Socially distant seating, mask mandates and temperature checks will be in place at many venues, but some experts remain concerned about community spread and the threat of more contagious variants of COVID-19. 

Manhattan Prosecutor Gets Trump Tax Records After Long Fight

In this Dec. 12, 2020, file photo President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington before boarding Marine One. (AP Photo / Patrick Semansky, File)

The Manhattan district attorney’s office enforced a subpoena on Donald Trump’s accounting firm within hours of the Supreme Court’s ruling on Monday and now has the documents in hand, a spokesperson for the office said Thursday.

US Jobless Claims Fall to 730,000 But Layoffs Remain High

In this Feb. 9, 2021 file photo, a passer-by walks past an employment hiring sign while entering a Target store location, in Westwood, Mass. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

Applications for benefits declined 111,000 from the previous week to a seasonally adjusted 730,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. It is the lowest figure since late November.

FDA Says Single-Dose Shot From J&J Prevents Severe COVID-19

This Dec. 2, 2020 photo provided by Johnson & Johnson shows vials of the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. (Johnson & Johnson via AP)

Johnson & Johnson’s single-dose vaccine offers strong protection against severe COVID-19, according to an analysis released Wednesday by U.S. regulators that sets the stage for a final decision on a new and easier-to-use shot to help tame the pandemic.

Fed’s Powell: US Economic Recovery Is Uneven and Incomplete

In this Dec. 1, 2020 file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell listens during a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Al Drago / The New York Times via AP, Pool)

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell underscored the U.S. economy’s ongoing weakness Tuesday in remarks that suggested that the Fed sees no need to alter its ultra-low interest rate policies anytime soon. 

NASA Releases Mars Landing Video: ‘Stuff of Our Dreams’

This combination of images from video made available by NASA shows steps in the descent of the Mars Perseverance rover as it approaches the surface of the planet on Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021. (NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP)

NASA on Monday released the first high-quality video of a spacecraft landing on Mars, a three-minute trailer showing the enormous orange and white parachute hurtling open and the red dust kicking up as rocket engines lowered the rover to the surface.

US Deaths Surpass 500K, Confirming Virus’s Tragic Reach

In this July 31, 2020, file photo, Romelia Navarro, 64, weeps while hugging her husband, Antonio, in his final moments in a COVID-19 unit at St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton, Calif. (AP Photo / Jae C. Hong, File)

At half a million, the toll recorded by Johns Hopkins University is already greater than the population of Miami or Kansas City, Missouri. It is roughly equal to the number of Americans killed in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War combined. It is akin to a 9/11 every day for nearly six months.

AG Nominee Garland Vows Capitol Riot Will be Top Priority

Judge Merrick Garland, nominee to be attorney general, testifies at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Monday, Feb. 22, 2021 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Demetrius Freeman / The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Merrick Garland, President Joe Biden’s attorney general nominee, vowed Monday to prioritize combating extremist violence and said his first focus would be on the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol as he sought to assure lawmakers that the Justice Department would remain politically independent on his watch.

Debris Falls From Plane During Emergency Landing Near Denver

In this photo provided by the Broomfield Police Department on Twitter, debris is scattered in the front yard of a house at near 13th and Elmwood, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2021, in Broomfield, Colo. (Broomfield Police Department via AP)

Debris from a United Airlines plane fell onto Denver suburbs during an emergency landing Saturday after one of its engines suffered a catastrophic failure and rained pieces of the engine casing on a neighborhood where it narrowly missed a home. 

Senator Seeks Probe of Natural Gas Price Spikes During Storm

This Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021 file photo shows power lines in Houston. (AP Photo / David J. Phillip, File)

A Democratic senator is calling for federal investigations into possible price gouging of natural gas in the Midwest and other regions following severe winter storms that plunged Texas and other states into a deep freeze.

What’s Safe After COVID-19 Vaccination? Don’t Shed Masks Yet

In this Feb. 19, 2021, file photo, people wait in line at a 24-hour, walk-up COVID-19 vaccination clinic hosted by the Black Doctors COVID-19 Consortium at Temple University’s Liacouras Center in Philadelphia. (AP Photo / Matt Rourke, File)

You’re fully vaccinated against the coronavirus — now what? Don’t expect to shed your mask and get back to normal activities right away. That’s going to be a disappointment, if not a shock, to many people. 

Weather Experts: Lack of Planning Caused Cold Catastrophe

This illustration made available by the National Weather Service on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021 shows a Feb. 10-14 forecast for below-normal temperatures for large parts of the United States. (National Weather Service via AP)

This week’s killer freeze in the U.S. was no surprise. Government and private meteorologists saw it coming, some nearly three weeks in advance. And yet catastrophe happened. At least 20 people have died and 4 million homes at some point lost power, heat or water.

Green Beret Pleads Not Guilty in Deadly Bowling Alley Attack

In this detail of a video conference screen, Duke Webb, accused of a January shooting that killed three and injured three, is arraigned at Winnebago County Justice Center on Friday, Feb. 19, 2021, in Rockford, Ill. (Scott P. Yates / Rockford Register Star via AP, Pool)

An Army special forces sergeant pleaded not guilty Friday to murder and other charges in the killing of three people and wounding of three others during a mass shooting at an Illinois bowling alley.

Massive Breach Fuels Calls for US Action on Cybersecurity

White House deputy national security adviser Anne Neuberger speaks during a press briefing, Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Jolted by a sweeping hack that may have revealed government and corporate secrets to Russia, U.S. officials are scrambling to reinforce the nation’s cyber defenses.

UN: Huge Changes in Society Needed to Keep Nature, Earth OK

In this Monday, Feb. 1, 2021 file photo, emissions from a coal-fired power plant are silhouetted against the setting sun in Independence, Mo. (AP Photo / Charlie Riedel)

Humans are making Earth a broken and increasingly unlivable planet through climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution. So the world must make dramatic changes to society, economics and daily life, a new United Nations report says.

Experts Warn Against COVID-19 Variants as States Reopen

In this Feb. 3, 2021, file photo, a patient adjusts his face mask as he leaves a COVID-19 vaccination site inside the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

Scientists widely agree that the U.S. simply doesn’t have enough of a handle on the variants to roll back public health measures and is at risk of fumbling yet another phase of the pandemic after letting the virus rage through the country over the last year.