Candidate for Chicago City Council

About the Candidate

Name: Leslie Fox
DOB: Dec. 28, 1964
Family: Mother of four children
Occupation: Leading current events discussions at Self- Help Home, a senior citizen residence in Lakeview. Also, I serve as an active volunteer at my children’s public schools and in my community.
Political Experience: I was appointed by Mayor Daley to be Executive Director of the city organization that ran the World Cup Games in 1994 and then the host committee that ran the Democratic National Committee in 1996. In both instances I directed all of the city department activities overseeing multi-million dollar budgets. I orchestrated Police, Fire, and Streets & Sanitation to get things done. Since then I have been deeply involved in my children's public schools and recently served as elected chair of the Lincoln Park High School’s Local School Council.
Website: foxfor43.com

Candidate Statement

I’m Leslie Fox.

I am running for Alderman in the 43rd Ward.

I am a mother of three children who attend and have attended Chicago Public Schools.

In fact, I am the only candidate who has kids in Public schools.

I got elected to Lincoln Parks Local School Council and just finished up as the Chairman.

In that position, I fought hard for the hiring of trained counselors.

Counselors with skills to teach teenagers how to handle problems without resorting to violence.

Cuts in schools and the spike in carjackings and shootings are the reason I launched this campaign.

I have a reputation for being direct, aggressive and most importantly getting things done.

Before I had my three kids, I ran the 1994 World Cup Soccer and then Democratic Convention in 1996. Both events showcased the City, both resulted in surpluses, and most importantly brought Chicagoans together.

With the Chicago Police Department, we worked to get the right staffing and set the right tone—We knew the whole world would be watching and we made sure we got it right.

And guess what? I if I disagreed on a policy with The Mayor, I told without hesitation DIRECTLY because that is who I am. I tell it to you straight.

I think it’s time for a 43rd Ward Alderman to lead and not follow ... To stand up for what's right.

As Alderman I will fight to restore the cuts in our police department.

Chicago has lost hundreds of experienced detectives, we are all feeling the impact.

As Alderman I will build coalitions with my colleagues to insure mental health centers that served our neediest citizens are reopened because keeping them open saves us money.

Our ward and all of Chicago will benefit by having an Alderman like me who is not afraid to stand up for what’s right.

And I promise you this: Developers, donors and special interests will never influence my decision making.

As Alderman of the 43rd ward you can count on me to make things happen, make things better, get stuff done.

Candidate Q&A

What is your vision for this office?

My vision is to bring aggressive, independent, and transparent leadership to our ward. Under my leadership the 43rd ward will be safe, united, and overflowing with community pride.

What is the most pressing issue facing constituents, and how can you help address it?

The most important issues facing the 43rd Ward is the increase in crime. To combat this rise in crime. I am committed to keeping police officers assigned to patrol the 43rd Ward on those police beats and not “detailing” officers to other parts of the city. We’re told that large numbers of new police officers are assigned to our 18th District. We’re not told that many will be shipped off to other neighborhoods on weekends and leave our neighborhoods unprotected. In our business districts I want police officers on foot so they can meet and talk with shop owners and citizens and to be visible members of the community. We lost hundreds of experienced detectives and Crime lab technicians who solved crimes and put violent criminals in prison. It is time to replenish the Chicago Police Department and make sure that officers that assigned to the ward stay in the ward.

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