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Pictured are E. coli bacteria, one of the many species of bacteria present in the human gut.

Inside the human body lives a community of microorganisms, bacteria, viruses and fungi known as the microbiome. Local professors talk about the importance of understanding the microbiome and the potential implications it could have on health and disease.

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(Nicholas James / Wikimedia Commons)

A new two-year grant program will seek out new community-based methods of getting minorities and women involved in science, technology, engineering and math careers.

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The new study's findings could help combat climate change while lessening our reliance on burning fossil fuels. (Jorge Royan / Wikimedia Commons)

Using a process similar to photosynthesis, scientists from Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Illinois at Chicago have converted carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, which can produce methanol and diesel fuels.

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More than a dozen Chicago women, many of whom have lived with HIV for 20-plus years, tell their stories in a new University of Illinois at Chicago exhibit.

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The waiting list of patients seeking an organ transplant has reached almost 125,000 people, but the amount of willing donors is far behind that number. We discuss the past, present and future of organ transplantation. Read the personal story of a nurse-turned-organ donor.

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For the last 50 years, Star Trek has captivated audiences as the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise explored the galaxy using technological advances – warp drive, wormholes, beaming technology, holodecks – in order to do so. Dirk K. Morr, a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, joins us to discuss the scientific ideas behind Star Trek technologies. View a graphic and read an interview.

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Researchers at two local universities are looking into how poverty impacts young minds. We have the story. Learn more about the studies, and view a photo gallery.

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A new book explores the racial identity of Mexicans and Puerto Ricans in Chicago after World War II -- neither white nor black, but sometimes a buffer between the two.