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Mayor Richard M. Daley shares his skepticism about heat-related deaths in the summer of 1995. (WTTW News)

A look back at Chicago’s deadly heat wave — and how it compares to the coronavirus pandemic — with Eric Klinenberg, author of the 2002 book, “Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago.”

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The Park District has opened some of its splash pads during the heatwave. (Chicago Park District)

The Chicago Park District has turned the water on at some, but not all, of its splash pads.

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A flooded Riverwalk along the Chicago River. (WTTW News)

This spring, Chicago saw record rainfall for the third May in a row – and with it, the return of flooded streets, parks and basements. A new analysis finds many more Chicago properties are at risk of flooding than previously thought.

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North Avenue Beach in 2018. (Frank Fujimoto / Flickr)

Chicagoans hoping to beat this week’s oppressive heat and humidity won’t be able to head to Chicago’s beaches to cool off “any time soon,” Mayor Lori Lightfoot said Monday.

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Lake Michigan. (VV Nincic / Flickr)

It’s not quite bathwater warm — that honor goes to Lake Erie — but Lake Michigan’s average surface temperature has topped 72 degrees thanks to the recent heat wave. 

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(R Boed/ Flickr)

“Be safe in all the ways that you can, protect yourself from the heat and protect yourself and all of Chicago from further spread of COVID-19,” Dr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, said Friday morning.

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Locust swarm. (Sarangib / Pixabay)

Forty million locusts are winding their way through Argentina and a massive dust cloud has crossed the Atlantic from the Sahara. What else could 2020 possibly have in store for us?

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In this Wednesday, May 27, 2020 file photo, a boy stands on the shore of the Ganges River during a hot summer day in Prayagraj, India. (AP Photo / Rajesh Kumar Singh)

Last month the global average temperature was 60.3 degrees, tying 2016 for the hottest May in 141 years of record keeping, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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Temperatures hit 94 degrees, a record for June 2. (Pixabay)

The mercury soared to 94 degrees on June 2, topping the previous record of 92 degrees set for the date back in 1944.

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Record rainfall in May has caused the Chicago River to rise and has taxed the region’s storm sewers. (WTTW News)

For the third year in a row, Chicago has set a new record for the most precipitation in May. But as rainy as it’s been, it will take an epic deluge to rival the city’s wettest month of all time.

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Chicago River stormwater diversion tunnel at work, with water flowing from the outtake. (Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

Early Monday morning, the North Branch Chicago River gauge at Pulaski Road showed the waterway at 17.87 feet, inches away from the river's "minor" flood level at 18 feet, according to National Weather Service data.

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Wet weather means it's time to minimize water entering the city's combined sewer system. (Vivek Jena / Flickr)

We’ve had a string of wet days, which stresses Chicago's combined sewer system. Here are conservation tips to minimize the chance of an overflow.

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Motorists huddle together after a 54 car pile-up early morning on the Kennedy Expressway Wednesday, April 15, 2020, in Chicago. (AP Photo / Paul Beaty)

Portions of a Chicago expressway left icy by a wintry blast that brought overnight snowfall led to a pileup involving of dozens of vehicles early Wednesday, sending 14 people to hospitals, officials said.

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Chicagoans woke up to a covering of snow Wednesday. (Patty Wetli / WTTW)

Could this year get any worse? Well yeah, it could. It once snowed in June, according to the National Weather Service.

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Spring is coming through with signs of life and hope. (Patty Wetli / WTTW)

Snowdrop, crocus, hyacinth and other early spring bloomers are cheering up the gloomy landscape.

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(Prayitno / Flickr)

On Friday, the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office reported four new cold-related deaths in the county.