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Neighbors with power have set up charging stations for those without in the Lincoln Square community. (Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

The physical destruction caused by Monday’s powerful storm, which saw a tornado touch down in Rogers Park, was as devastating as a hurricane, according to ComEd. Now some neighbors are leading the charge on helping out.

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Monday's storm caused widespread damage, including in Chicago’s Lincoln Square, where a Weatherbug station recorded an 85 mph wind gust. (Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

The National Weather Service has confirmed that a tornado touched down in Rogers Park during Monday’s powerful storm. Thousands of Chicagoans remained without power Tuesday morning. 

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A group of neighbors surveys the damage to vehicles on their block after a severe thunderstorm battered Chicago neighborhoods, Monday, Aug. 10, 2020. (Tyler LaRiviere / Sun-Times / Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

A rare storm packing 100 mph winds and with power similar to an inland hurricane swept across the Midwest on Monday, blowing over trees, flipping vehicles, causing widespread property damage and leaving hundreds of thousands without power.

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(Daniel Dione / Flickr)

The city is directing residents without air conditioning to its cooling centers and park district splash pads and renewing calls for people to check in on elderly and vulnerable family members, friends and neighbors.

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(Zoltan Matuska / Pixabay)

With temperatures set to soar in Chicago in the coming days, Dr. Allison Arwady reassured residents that it’s “safe and appropriate” to use air conditioning in their apartments and homes without risking the spread of COVID-19.

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Mayor Richard M. Daley shares his skepticism about heat-related deaths in the summer of 1995. (WTTW News)

A look back at Chicago’s deadly heat wave — and how it compares to the coronavirus pandemic — with Eric Klinenberg, author of the 2002 book, “Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago.”

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The Park District has opened some of its splash pads during the heatwave. (Chicago Park District)

The Chicago Park District has turned the water on at some, but not all, of its splash pads.

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A flooded Riverwalk along the Chicago River. (WTTW News)

This spring, Chicago saw record rainfall for the third May in a row – and with it, the return of flooded streets, parks and basements. A new analysis finds many more Chicago properties are at risk of flooding than previously thought.

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North Avenue Beach in 2018. (Frank Fujimoto / Flickr)

Chicagoans hoping to beat this week’s oppressive heat and humidity won’t be able to head to Chicago’s beaches to cool off “any time soon,” Mayor Lori Lightfoot said Monday.

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Lake Michigan. (VV Nincic / Flickr)

It’s not quite bathwater warm — that honor goes to Lake Erie — but Lake Michigan’s average surface temperature has topped 72 degrees thanks to the recent heat wave. 

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(R Boed/ Flickr)

“Be safe in all the ways that you can, protect yourself from the heat and protect yourself and all of Chicago from further spread of COVID-19,” Dr. Allison Arwady, commissioner of the Chicago Department of Public Health, said Friday morning.

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Locust swarm. (Sarangib / Pixabay)

Forty million locusts are winding their way through Argentina and a massive dust cloud has crossed the Atlantic from the Sahara. What else could 2020 possibly have in store for us?

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In this Wednesday, May 27, 2020 file photo, a boy stands on the shore of the Ganges River during a hot summer day in Prayagraj, India. (AP Photo / Rajesh Kumar Singh)

Last month the global average temperature was 60.3 degrees, tying 2016 for the hottest May in 141 years of record keeping, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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Temperatures hit 94 degrees, a record for June 2. (Pixabay)

The mercury soared to 94 degrees on June 2, topping the previous record of 92 degrees set for the date back in 1944.

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Record rainfall in May has caused the Chicago River to rise and has taxed the region’s storm sewers. (WTTW News)

For the third year in a row, Chicago has set a new record for the most precipitation in May. But as rainy as it’s been, it will take an epic deluge to rival the city’s wettest month of all time.

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Chicago River stormwater diversion tunnel at work, with water flowing from the outtake. (Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

Early Monday morning, the North Branch Chicago River gauge at Pulaski Road showed the waterway at 17.87 feet, inches away from the river's "minor" flood level at 18 feet, according to National Weather Service data.