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(Krzysztof Kamil / Pixabay)

If you wake up in the middle of the night and start browsing social media or turn on the TV, you might have difficulty falling back asleep or feel groggy later on, but your sleep-wake cycle should remain intact, according to a new Northwestern University study.

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(Photo by Stefano Ferrario / Pixabay)

An analysis of 44,000 American women found those who reported sleeping at night in a room with a television on or a light were more likely to gain at least 11 pounds over about five years than those who slept in darkness.

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Left: Sunrise over Lake Michigan. (rlobes / Pixabay). Right: Moon over Chicago. (nathanmac87 / Flickr)

The adage, “early to bed early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise,” takes on new meaning thanks to research by scientists in Chicago and England.

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Whether you’re a night owl or an early bird, your sleep is regulated by your circadian rhythm. A sleep expert helps unravel the mystery of our internal clock.

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“Both sleep and cortisol are connected to the ability to learn and perform academic tasks,” said researcher Jennifer Heissel. “Our study identifies a pathway by which violent crime may get under the skin to affect academic performance.”

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Older adults who say their lives have meaning are more likely to get a good night’s sleep and less likely to suffer from sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome, according to a new study.

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Deep sleep is vital to memory and decreases with age. Playing pink noise – described as a waterfall-like sound – in sync with a person’s brain waves was found to enhance deep sleep and sleep-dependent memory retention in older adults, according to a new Northwestern study.

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She's the co-founder and editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post and a syndicated columnist. Arianna Huffington talks about the wake-up call that led her to write her 15th book, "The Sleep Revolution."

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(Credit traska / Flickr)

“People need to think of adequate sleep as an important aspect of maintaining good health," said Erin Hanlon, Ph.D., lead author of a new University of Chicago study linking insufficient sleep with increased consumption of snacks and high-energy, high-fat foods.

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