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“Sacred Under the Cliff of Yellowstone” (Credit: Ben Pease / The Field Museum)

On March, a day after the mayor canceled St. Patrick’s Day parades, another parade celebrated the opening of twin exhibitions on Native American people. The shows opened ... and then closed one day later.

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Chicagoan Lynika Strozier was honored by her peers during #BlackBotanistsWeek. (Field Museum / Corrie Moreau)

Following social media campaigns like #BlackBirdersWeek and #BlackHikerWeek, a group of Black plant scientists from around the world is creating a community around — and celebrating — Black people who love plants.  

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A monarch butterfly feeds on milkweed, which is the sole food source for monarch caterpillars. (Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

Scores of Chicagoans have planted milkweed — the monarch’s host plant — in their yards and other green spaces, but how effective are those efforts? The Field Museum is recruiting citizen scientists to find out.

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Dandelions are an important food source for pollinators, especially in the spring. (Patty Wetli / WTTW News)

The dandelion — a once-prized plant that gardeners used to exhibit at county fairs — now holds the title of Public Lawn Enemy No. 1. But is this reputation deserved?

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Carl Cotton (Courtesy of the Field Museum)

Taxidermy – the process of preserving animals – isn’t usually classified as fine art. But the Field Museum is challenging that idea by shining a light on the artist behind many of the museum’s own examples. 

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An image from the 1972 Apollo mission. (Credit: NASA)

Local scientists use a powerful new tool to make fresh discoveries from moon dust first collected nearly 50 years ago.

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A 4-pound piece of a meteorite that struck Costa Rica earlier this year was handed over to the Field Museum on Oct. 7, 2019. (John Weinstein / Field Museum)

A 4-pound chunk of a rare type of meteorite that crashed into a Costa Rican village this spring has found its way to Chicago, and experts say the rock likely contains clues to the origins of life on Earth.

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An Apsáalooke war bonnet with a long tail, indicating that it was worn by only chiefs or accomplished warriors. (John Weinstein / Field Museum)

The first-of-its-kind exhibit in 2020 will explore the history and culture of the Apsáalooke people, an indigenous group known for its horsemanship, artistic pursuits and matriarchal ways of life.

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New sensory features allow Field Museum visitors to smell the rotting-flesh stench of Sue the T. Rex’s breath. (Martin Baumgaertner / Field Museum)

New “sensory stations” allow visitors to get a more intimate experience of the museum’s iconic dinosaur – including the stench of Sue’s post-meal breath.

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A New Guinea crocodile. (Midori / Wikimedia Commons)

By examining 51 crocodile skulls, Field Museum scientist Caleb McMahan was able to identify a previously unclassified species native to New Guinea. 

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(Free-Photos / Pixabay)

The Field Museum will be at the center of Chicago’s youth climate strike Friday as activists across the globe hold what is expected to be one of the largest environmental demonstrations in the history of the planet.

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An image of rice fields in Ubud, Bali, submitted as part of the study by an archaeologist from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. (Lucas Stephens / University of Pennsylvania)

Humans in many areas of the world were farming, burning forests, grazing their animals and causing major changes to the environment some 1,000 years earlier than previously thought. 

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In a photograph titled “West Bull Nose,” Brad Temkin depicts one of the exits of Chicago’s Deep Tunnel. (Brad Temkin / The Field Museum)

Chicago photographer Brad Temkin offers a rare look at the hidden network of tunnels and infrastructure designed to deliver water, including Chicago’s 109-mile Deep Tunnel.

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(Courtesy The Chicago Brewseum)

A new dry-hopped cream ale is made from the same types of barley and corn found in the museum’s original collections from 1893, the same year more than 27 million visitors flocked to Chicago for the World’s Columbian Exposition.

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(Courtesy The Field Museum)

Chicago and other U.S. cities could provide nearly one-third of the milkweed plant scientists estimate is needed to save monarch butterflies, whose populations have plummeted in recent decades. 

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A new exhibit at the Field Museum showcases “The Birds of America,” a groundbreaking book published by painter and ornithologist John James Audubon. (Michelle Kuo / Field Museum)

The groundbreaking book “Birds of America” by painter and ornithologist John James Audubon features intricate watercolor paintings of nearly every bird on the continent. It’s now on display at the Field Museum.