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In this Aug. 18, 2020, file photo, students wear masks on campus at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

As more and more schools and businesses around the country get the OK to reopen, college towns are moving in the opposite direction because of too much partying and too many COVID-19 infections among students.

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(FeeLoona / Pixabay)

The number of Illinois kindergarteners hitting readiness requirements has increased statewide, but more than two-thirds of students are still not meeting those goals. Education advocates say there’s more work that must be done to eliminate systemic inequalities.

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St. Francis Xavier School students and their families walk together in Newark, on Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, after discussing the Catholic school's permanent closure announced the previous week by the Archdiocese of Newark. Nationwide, more than 140 Catholic schools will not reopen in the fall. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)

Already this year, financial and enrollment problems aggravated by the pandemic have forced the permanent closure of more than 140 Catholic schools nationwide, according to officials who oversee Catholic education in the country.

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The new instruction plan includes the distribution of 100,000 technology devices to the highest-need families as well as both online and non-digital learning activities.

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Nearly a week after the Illinois primary election, Gov. Bruce Rauner said Monday he has not received any commitment from House Speaker Michael Madigan to resume negotiations on a state budget for what remains of the current fiscal year. 

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Screen shot from "Most Likely to Succeed"

Imagine a high school where classrooms aren't divided by subject matter, and there aren't even class periods or bells – and teachers are told to teach however they want. That's the reality for a high school in California profiled in the documentary, "Most Likely to Succeed."

Daily Herald and WBEZ Series Focuses on Education and Poverty

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Credit: Daily Herald

In the first of a four-part series, Daily Herald reporter Melissa Silverberg and WBEZ's Linda Lutton take a look at poverty and education in Illinois. Their studies of state testing over the last decade revealed that the schools with the most low-income students performed the worst. Silverberg and Tim Broderick, data analyst and graphic designer for the project, join us tonight to share their results of the state Poverty-Achievement gap.

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Chicago is already offering free community college tuition to local students, and nationwide, President Barack Obama is proposing a similar plan. We talk to experts about why community colleges have received a renewed focus.

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U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, former Chicago Public Schools CEO, is in town for the Education Writers Association National Seminar. Brandis Friedman has the latest. 

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The School Project is a Chicago-based documentary series that is tracking the past and present status of the city's public school system. The fourth episode  focuses on the battle over standardized testing.

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As schools across the state begin to administer the controversial PARCC test to students, parents and legislators are pushing a movement and legislation to allow parents to let their children opt out of the test.

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In recent weeks, the Chicago Board of Education has received letters from both the state Board of Education and the U.S. Department of Education threatening the loss of more than $1 billion if Chicago Public Schools fails to administer the controversial standardized test, PARCC. Wednesday's meeting is the Board's first since those communications from the state and federal governments. Find out what, if any, action they take. We also have reaction to the referendum on an elected school board, and information on what actions the school board is considering to save $10 million.

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Teachers, parents, and administrators have been debating whether schools should start implementing the PARCC standardized test, designed to align with the new Common Core standards. We talk with two educators about whether it's time to put the PARCC in place and the value of standardized testing.

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Whether it’s been 10 years or 30 years since they dropped out of high school, men and women who went on to serve time in jail or prison are finally getting their diplomas. We explain how programs like St. Leonard’s Ministries are getting help from Cook County to keep people out of jail and reduce violence.

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A new report says the state is falling behind in funding its public schools. But with finances a mess, where will incoming governor Bruce Rauner find the money?

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GOP candidate for governor Bruce Rauner unveils a plan to increase education funding for early childhood, K-12, and college. But critics say he has no way to pay for it.

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