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(WTTW News)

A major clean energy package had been one of Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s goals for 2020, but that got pushed aside because of the pandemic, and waylaid after a bribery scheme involving Commonwealth Edison came to light.

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(Ken Teegardin / Flicker)

It’s about the time of year when your mailbox may start to fill up with glossy brochures, pitching you not on a product — but on a candidate. What impact the ComEd bribery scandal might have on the coming election.

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(WTTW News)

“I have no plans to resign,” Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan said Thursday in a statement as a growing number of Democrats encourage him to step down due to his entanglement in Commonwealth Edison’s bribery scandal.  

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(WTTW News)

Aldermen raked officials from Commonwealth Edison over the coals Thursday, demanding answers about the firm’s admission that it engaged in a yearslong bribery scheme even as officials warned the city would have no choice but to extend the utility’s lucrative city contract.

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(Ken Teegardin / Flickr)

Commonwealth Edison must pay a $200 million fine to the federal government as part of its deal with the U.S. attorney’s office. That fine will go to federal coffers — not ComEd customers. But a lawsuit is seeking to change that.

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(WTTW News)

Mayor Lori Lightfoot warned Commonwealth Edison officials Monday that the utility would have to make significant changes if it wants to keep its lucrative city contract following a yearslong bribery scheme.

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In this May 23, 2020 file photo, Illinois Speaker of the House Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, talks on his cellphone from his desk during an extended session of the Illinois House of Representatives at the Bank of Springfield Center, in Springfield, Ill. (Justin L. Fowler / The State Journal-Register via AP, Pool, File)

Federal prosecutors recently indicated Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan is a subject of a criminal investigation into influence peddling to benefit an energy utility. Will the 78-year-old be charged and if so with what possible crimes?

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(WTTW News)

ComEd is set to pay a $200 million fine as it seeks to get a bribery charge dismissed. Where will the money come from?

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Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan (WTTW News)

The agreement ComEd reached to plead guilty to one count of bribery on Friday sent shock waves through the political world when “Public Official A” was described as the speaker of the Illinois House. 

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(WTTW News)

A federal bombshell alleges a massive bribery scheme involving ComEd and Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan. Has Madigan’s political reign come to an end? And Chicago Public Schools announces a hybrid reopening plan for the fall.

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(Daniel X. O'Neil / Flickr)

Mayor Lori Lightfoot vowed Friday to hold Commonwealth Edison to “account” for its conduct after the state’s largest utility agreed to pay a $200 million fine to resolve federal corruption charges stemming from a “yearslong bribery scheme.” 

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In this July 26, 2017 file photo, Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan speaks at a news conference at the state capitol in Springfield, Illinois. (Justin Fowler / The State Journal-Register via AP, File)

Longtime Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan denies having done anything criminal or improper despite being implicated Friday in court filings that charge utility Commonwealth Edison with bribery.

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(Daniel X. O'Neil / Flickr)

Aldermen who want Chicago to cut ties with Commonwealth Edison and form its own electric utility acknowledged this week that the pandemic and the economic crisis it triggered has dimmed the effort’s chances of success.

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(WTTW News)

A Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ruling issued in December could lead to a spike in your energy bills – but then again, maybe not. It’s the latest energy battle set to play out in Springfield.

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Byron Nuclear Generating Station in Ogle County, Illinois. (Christopher Peterson / Wikimedia Commons)

The Securities and Exchange Commission has opened an investigation of Exelon and ComEd’s lobbying activities. The U.S. attorney’s office in Chicago also is probing the lobbying practices of the two companies in Illinois. 

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Former Exelon CEO Anne Pramaggiore, who retired Tuesday (Exelon / Facebook)

Former Exelon CEO Anne Pramaggiore is in line for $7.7 million in benefits after her abrupt resignation Tuesday amid a federal investigation of the company’s Springfield lobbying practices. 

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