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State Street in Chicago (WTTW News)

Every year, millions of people visit State Street in the heart of Chicago’s Loop. But is the street working the way it should? That’s the question the Chicago Loop Alliance is asking as it considers what State Street could be.

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Fulton Market was once an integral part of Chicago’s meatpacking industry. (Courtesy of the Chicago History Museum)

Fulton Market in Chicago’s West Loop is home to some of the city’s trendiest restaurants – and its highest rents. But the area’s history as an economic powerhouse is anything but new. Geoffrey Baer takes us back.

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(Courtesy Jimmy Nuter)

Chicagoans have long taken pride in the city’s history and architecture, but as areas of the city are redeveloped, some of that is lost. Jimmy Nuter is doing all he can to rescue treasures from the city’s earliest days.

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Vintage valentine from the Andrew McNally collection at the Newberry Library. (Courtesy of the Newberry Library)

The Newberry’s collection of vintage valentines is spreading old-fashioned romance across the internet.

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A viewer’s photo of her mother at a glamorous restaurant in 1940s Chicago left her wondering where the photo was taken. And we finally address an elephant in the room at Marshall Field’s.

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An undated photo shows Cornelius Coffey

You may have heard of Bessie Coleman, the pioneering African American pilot from Chicago. But there is much more to the history of black aviation in this town. And though that story has been largely forgotten, it’s now inspiring a new generation of aviators.

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(WTTW News)

Signs for Douglas Park on Chicago’s West Side have received an unofficial update in recent weeks: a second “s.” The change comes after years of activisim in North Lawndale to rename the park.

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Carl Cotton (Courtesy of the Field Museum)

Taxidermy – the process of preserving animals – isn’t usually classified as fine art. But the Field Museum is challenging that idea by shining a light on the artist behind many of the museum’s own examples. 

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A brick building in the Italianate style at 110 W. Grand Ave. (Felix Mendez / WTTW News)

A proposed new landmark district aims to protect historic Chicago homes from demolition, but some owners worry it will tie their hands.

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Shel Silverstein, left, performs on “Soundstage” at WTTW in 1979. (WTTW News)

What does a song about a mythical creature have to do with one of Chicago’s most prolific – and unusual – artists? Geoffrey Baer explains.

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55 West Wacker Drive, originally the Blue Cross Blue Shield Building, is an archetypal example of brutalism. (WTTW News)

Love it or hate it, the architectural style known as brutalism has left its mark on cities all over the world. So what’s the story of brutalism in Chicago? Geoffrey Baer weighs in.

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Chicago Sun-Times photographers, 1956. (Courtesy the Chicago History Museum)

Journalism, we often hear, is a “first draft of history.” That makes old newspaper photos an excellent window into the past. We get a peek.

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A rendering of the proposed renovation of the Remova Theatre in Bridgeport. (Credit O’Riley Office LLC)

For decades, the Ramova Theatre has languished in neglect. But after years of neighborhood activism and a new redevelopment proposal, the old movie house could soon be transformed into an updated version of its former self. 

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Photographs from the Archive of Joseph Sterling (Courtesy Stephen Daiter Gallery)

Sixty years ago, a young photography student aimed his camera at Chicago teens. His name was Joseph Sterling, and we visited an old classmate of his for a closer look at the process of capturing youth culture and Chicago in the mid-20th century.

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The Chicago band Verboten in the 1980s. (Courtesy of Jason Narducy)

A new rock musical from the House Theatre of Chicago tells the incredible story of a teenage punk band from Evanston. We meet the cast of “Verboten” and an original member of the band.

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Paul Adams III appears on “Chicago Tonight” on Jan. 20, 2020. (WTTW News)

Martin Luther King Jr. was known for speaking out against racial segregation, voter disenfranchisement and economic inequality. We discuss his life and legacy with a man who marched with him: Paul Adams III.