Stories by Linda Qiu

Thinking Big About Sewage: Thornton Reservoir Nears Completion

As the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District cuts the ribbon on it's new sewage reservoir, we revisit Jay Shefsky's visit in May to the bottom of the Thornton Quarry.

The Evocative Paintings of Chicago's Jazz Age Modernist

A rare survey of the painter Archibald Motley draws to a close later this month at the Cultural Center. Chicago Tonight revisits the brilliantly colorful canvases of this often-overlooked African-American painter, whose variety of subjects and captured the Jazz Age like no one else.

Life After Hate

Former Skinhead Leader Reflects on Personal Transformation

Christian Picciolini was once a neo-Nazi skinhead leader in Chicago. Today he runs an organization called Life After Hate. Jay Shefsky tells the story of Picciolini's remarkable transformation.

Thinking Big About Sewage

When it comes to treating our sewage, Chicago has a history of thinking big from reversing the flow of the Chicago River to the creation of Deep Tunnel. Jay Shefsky visited the Thornton Quarry and went to the bottom of Deep Tunnel to see where the water will flow into the new reservoir later this year. We revisit that story.    

City Goats

Earlier this spring, Jay Shefsky visited a Chicago family that has added goats to the chickens, ducks, and bees in their backyard farm. We revisit that story. 

The Evocative Paintings of Chicago's Jazz Age Modernist

Painter Archibald Motley created a revealing body of work that captured Chicago people and nightlife during the Jazz Age. We revisit our story about the Motley exhibition at the Chicago Cultural Center.

Springfield News with Amanda Vinicky

As Illinois' Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan pushes for a three percent millionaire's tax to raise fresh revenue for the cash-strapped state, Republican lawmakers respond with a proposal for term limits to limit the power of long-time legislative leaders like Madigan. Chicago Tonight Springfield reporter Amanda Vinicky rounds up all the latest news.

The Little Rock Nine

The Little Rock Nine changed history when they integrated Central High School in Little Rock, Ark. in 1957. They join us to discuss their activism and their thoughts on the current state of race relations in America.

Thinking Big About Sewage

Jay Shefsky visits the Thornton Quarry and goes to the bottom of Deep Tunnel to see where the water will flow into the new reservoir later this year.    

Local Doctor on Treating Earthquake Victims in Nepal

Just back from Nepal yesterday, we speak with a local doctor who was in Nepal providing knee and hip replacements. We get the latest from her on the unfolding humanitarian crisis.

Art of Papercutting Opens Window into China and Chicago

An exhibition at The Field Museum looks at City Windows, the papercut artwork of Chinese artist Qiao Xiaoguang now on display at two locations in Chicago. We revisit the story.

Sports and Brain Injury

As awareness increases about the risk of traumatic brain injury while playing contact sports and the possible long-term health impacts, we talk to Dorothy Kozlowski, a professor of biological sciences at DePaul University whose research focuses on understanding and treating the injured brain.

Colombian Artist's Work Speaks to Universal Themes

Doris Salcedo, A Flor de Piel, 2011–12, Rose petals and thread; photo: Photo: Hugo Glendinning

An artist revered in her home country of Colombia has made a strong impression on the international art world. We revisit our story about the MCA Chicago exhibition of Doris Salcedo's first-ever retrospective. 

Civic Federation Says Rauner’s Proposed Budget Is “Unachievable”

“Unachievable.” That's what fiscal watchdog group The Civic Federation calls Gov. Bruce Rauner's proposed 2016 fiscal budget in a new report released today. And the report comes a day after Rauner gave an unprecedented speech to the Chicago City Council, saying city officials shouldn't expect a bail out from the state. Tonight we talk with a panel of experts about what this means for the city and the state.

Life After Hate

Former Skinhead Leader Reflects on Personal Transformation

Christian Picciolini was once a neo-Nazi skinhead leader in Chicago. Today he runs an organization called Life After Hate. Jay Shefsky tells the story of Picciolini's remarkable transformation.  

Scientific Chicago With Neil Shubin

Scientist Neil Shubin is back to tell us why the U.S. Military is so interested in the bombardier beetle, why taking a hands-on approach is a better way to learn science, and why astronomers may want to avoid using the microwave when heating their lunch.

Nature Preserve Comes to Life

In 2011, the Chicago Park District bought 20 acres of land on the city's north side. The plot of land had sat unused and untended for many years. Nearly four years later, work on the nature preserve is moving quickly with a scheduled unveiling set for this summer. We get a preview.

The State of Chicago Trees

One in five parkway trees in Chicago is threatened by the Emerald Ash Borer beetle. So what can people do to stop the shrinking of the region's tree canopy? The Morton Arboretum's CEO, Gerry Donnelly, joins us to talk about reversing tree loss.

City Goats

Jay Shefsky visits a Chicago family that has added goats to the chickens, ducks, and bees in their backyard farm.  

The Threat of "Superbugs"

The World Health Organization warns that the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria or "superbugs" means that we could be on the brink of a "post-antibiotic era" in which common infections and minor injuries can once again kill. They say the situation is "so serious that it threatens the achievements of modern medicine." We talk with two experts about the scale of the threat and what we can all do to try and contain it.

Landmark Illinois Names Most Endangered Historic Places

A state agency charged with preserving landmarks finds itself listed on a list of “most endangered historic places” by another preservation group. The 44-year-old nonprofit Landmarks Illinois unveiled Wednesday its annual list of historic places across the state that are in jeopardy, and it included the state’s Historic Preservation Agency.

Tasty Web Series Chows Down on Local Food

WTTW's new web series, Foodphiles, looks at Chicago area restaurants and the diverse characters who keep them cooking.

Scientific Chicago with Rabiah Mayas

The 25th anniversary of the Hubble telescope is this month, scientists find a potential breakthrough in our understanding of Alzheimer's disease, and the likelihood of finding life on Mars just went up. Rabiah Mayas, Director of Science and Integrated Strategies at the Museum of Science and Industry, rounds up the top local and international science news.

Chicago Festival of Music and Movies Grows Up Fast

CIMMfest, the Chicago International Movies and Music Festival, has quickly evolved into a spring destination. We'll speak with the new program director, who came from the Sundance Festival.

Surprising "Dog Flu" Find Generates More Concerns

Officials say the outbreak of the so-called dog flu throughout the Chicago area is now of greater concern than originally thought. Dr. Donna Alexander, administrator of the Cook County Department of Animal & Rabies Control, tells us what the latest findings mean for pets and what animal control officials are doing to contain the outbreak.

Live Music from Lyric’s "Carousel"

Lyric Opera presents its annual musical, Carousel. Singers will discuss and perform two songs from the beloved Rodgers & Hammerstein show.

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