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This illustration provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in January 2020 shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

Federal health officials say Americans should begin preparing for a potentially severe outbreak of COVID-19. “Now is the time for businesses, hospitals, communities, schools, and everyday people to begin preparing,” said Dr. Nancy Messonnier of the CDC.

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A recent review of government-funded cancer research studies found that the participants were disproportionately white. A new state law attempts to fix that.

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(Ken Teegardin / Flickr)

According to a new survey, four out of five Illinois residents are concerned about being able to afford some aspect of health care in the future, such as prescription drugs and health insurance.

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(Prayitno / Flickr)

On Friday, the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office reported four new cold-related deaths in the county.

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Democratic presidential candidates, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., right, speaks as former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg looks on during a Democratic presidential primary debate Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2020, in Las Vegas, hosted by NBC News and MSNBC. (AP Photo / John Locher)

One particular issue keeps rising to the top of voters’ concerns this primary season. Medicare for All took center stage at the democratic debate in Las Vegas this week – and the candidates pulled no punches.

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(evita-ochel / Pixabay)

A free public event Friday will focus on food inequality across Chicago’s 77 community areas. We discuss the event with Rodger Cooley, executive director of the Chicago Food Policy Action Council.

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(Lisa Runnels / Pixabay)

In a small study, pregnant women diagnosed with the novel coronavirus during their third trimester didn’t spread the virus to their newborns. While a local researcher called those results exciting, he said they can’t be generalized to all pregnant women. 

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(sarcifilippo / Pixabay)

A new report from Northwestern Medicine suggests Medicaid patients are being prescribed too many antibiotics. What that could mean for public health.

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(Vaping360 / Flickr)

Vaping-related illnesses have killed more than 60 people across the U.S. since March – including five in Illinois – and hospitalized 2,758 others, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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This illustration provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in January 2020 shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

Chicago is among five U.S. cities that will test patients who exhibit flu-like symptoms for the novel coronavirus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Chicago’s Chinatown neighborhood has been struggling economically since the virus started making headlines. (WTTW News)

At a press conference Thursday in Chinatown, state and local health officials sought to reassure the public that the risk of contracting the deadly virus is low, and that Chicagoans should go about their daily lives.

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(Images Money / Flickr)

Flushing unused or expired prescription drugs down the toilet is “neither safe nor responsible,” says one local official. A new bill would establish convenient statewide locations for their collection instead.

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This illustration provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in January 2020 shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

The disease caused by a new virus that emerged late last year in China and has since sickened tens of thousands of people now has an official name: COVID-19.

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A woman puts on a mask near a notice board that reads “Bans on wild animals trading following the coronavirus outbreak” at a cafe in Beijing, Monday, Feb. 10, 2020. (AP Photo / Andy Wong)

China reported a rise in new virus cases Monday, denting optimism that disease control measures including isolating major cities might be working, while the operator of a cruise ship in Japan reported dozens of new cases.

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A traffic policeman adjusts his mask on a street in Beijing, Sunday, Feb. 9, 2020. (AP Photo / Andy Wong)

China’s virus death toll rose by 89 on Sunday to 811, passing the number of fatalities in the 2002-2003 SARS epidemic, but fewer new cases were reported in a possible sign its spread may be slowing.

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(Photo by Lightscape / Unsplash)

Taking a break from alcohol after the holidays has become known as the “dry January” trend. But now that January is over, some people are extending their sobriety, trying out a social life that’s not dependent on alcohol.