|
Chicago Pride Parade in 2011 (Keith Hinkle / Flickr)

A massive parade, dance lessons, mariachi ensembles and lots of hot sauce usher in the weekend. Here are 10 things to do in and around Chicago.

Motion claims offer was made to feds months after Christensen’s arrest

|
Yingying Zhang disappeared on June 9, 2017. (University of Illinois Police Department). Inset: Brendt Christensen (Macon County Sheriff’s Department)

Attorneys for Brendt Christensen say he offered to cooperate with investigators and disclose what he did with the Chinese scholar’s remains in return for a life sentence just six months after his 2017 arrest.

|

Geoffrey Baer deposits some knowledge about buildings left behind by the banking panics of the Great Depression in this encore edition of Ask Geoffrey.

|
Musician R. Kelly departs from the Leighton Criminal Court building after a status hearing in his criminal sexual abuse trial Wednesday, June 26, 2019 in Chicago. (AP Photo / Amr Alfiky)

Prosecutors have turned over to R. Kelly’s attorneys a tape they say shows the singer having sex with a minor girl two decades ago.

|
Audience members enter Symphony Center on opening night of Verdi’s “Aida.” (Credit: Todd Rosenberg)

Despite the dire warnings about “the demise of the audience for classical music,” there is a significant audience in Chicago that values this incomparable art form. Two recent, radically different CSO concerts are prime examples.

|
(Ken Teegardin / Flickr)

Although the idea behind reparations is “as old as slavery,” it’s gaining more traction than ever before, said Alvin Tillery, a political science professor at Northwestern University.

|

The new exhibition “Nature Connects” adds colorful creatures to the arboretum’s grounds using more than half a million Lego bricks.

|

Near-record rainfall has left many farms and gardens underwater, but some area gardens – including our WTTW organic garden – appear to be thriving. Organic gardener Jeanne Nolan explains why.

|
A still image from video footage released by Chicago police Monday, June	24, 2019 shows the “Empire” actor wearing a thin white rope wrapped around his neck that he told detectives was a noose.

Chicago police on Monday released hundreds of files from the investigation into Jussie Smollett’s claim he was attacked by two men, including releasing video footage for the first time of the “Empire” actor wearing a thin white rope wrapped around his neck.

|
Blackhawks top draft pick Kirby Dock.

Blackhawks top draft pick Kirby Dock wants to help bring the Stanley Cup back to Chicago. Hawks executives John McDonough and Stan Bowman tell us how they plan to make that happen.

|
Steven Nasatir, CEO of the Jewish United Fund, appears on “Chicago Tonight.”

The head of Chicago’s largest Jewish organization reflects on 40 years of leadership and a renewed rise of anti-Semitism. 

|
(Creative Commons / © 2013, Jeremy Atherton)

Responding to increasing public concern over environmental health threats, researchers have published a guide designed to help residents of Great Lakes communities determine if air, water or soil contamination is affecting their health. 

|
Yingying Zhang disappeared on June 9, 2017. (University of Illinois Police Department). Inset: Brendt Christensen (Macon County Sheriff’s Department)

Brendt Christensen has been found guilty in the kidnapping and death of Chinese scholar Yingying Zhang, setting the stage for what could be the first death sentence handed down within Illinois since the state abolished capital punishment in 2011.

|
Team UCAN, a North Lawndale-based nonprofit, used the chant “UCAN!” (or “You can!”) to paddle in sync with each other. (Evan Garcia / WTTW)

Thirty-four teams competed Saturday in the Dragon Boat Race for Literacy in Chinatown’s Ping Tom Park – the most competitors in the event’s 19-year history. 

|
Taste of Lincoln Avenue (Special Events Management)

Up next: Chicago Pride Parade, Chicago SummerDance, Back Lot Bash, Logan Square Arts Festival, Millennium Art Festival, Chi-Town Hot Sauce Expo and more.

|
(Courtesy The Field Museum)

Chicago and other U.S. cities could provide nearly one-third of the milkweed plant scientists estimate is needed to save monarch butterflies, whose populations have plummeted in recent decades. 

randomness