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On the South Side of Chicago is a relatively small but academically renowned museum whose founder James Henry Breasted helped rewrite the history of human civilization. We go for a look.

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How did a Lincoln Park statue wind up standing in cities all over the world? Geoffrey Baer goes south of the border for the answer. 

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(Photo by RickMajewski / Northalsted / GoPride)

A Halloween parade, immersive plays, fried dough and plenty of games usher in the weekend. Here are 10 things to do in and around Chicago.

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John Leguizamo in “Latin History for Morons.” (Photo by Matthew Murphy)

There is no denying the ferocity of John Leguizamo’s tragicomic jeremiad, his bravura gifts as a terrific physical performer, or his ability to improvise in “Latin History for Morons.”

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In this Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019 photo, neighbors Beth LeFauve, left, and Nelson Gonzalez pose for a portrait outside their two Bernard Street homes and the Halloween decorations spanning both properties in Chicago. (AP Photo / Charles Rex Arbogast)

The good news for kids this Halloween: They’ll likely come home with a bigger pile of candy than of healthy snacks while out trick-or-treating.

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A rendering shows the north-facing view of the public plaza and Museum building, as viewed from the roof of the Chicago Public Library building. (Credit: The Obama Foundation)

At the Obama Foundation Summit on Tuesday, Barack and Michelle Obama spoke about, among other things, the future of the Obama Presidential Center in Jackson Park. Chicago Tribune architecture critic Blair Kamin weighs in on the new design.

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John Leguizamo in “Latin History for Morons.” (Photo by Matthew Murphy)

If your Latin history is a little rusty, actor and writer John Leguizamo understands – and he’s here to offer an antidote in the form of his latest one-man show, playing in Chicago this week. We get a preview.

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A new exhibit at the Chicago History Museum highlights the experiences of Muslims in Chicago through audio interviews, photographs, videos, artwork, maps and everyday objects. We go for a look.

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Ronnie Marmo as Lenny Bruce. (Photo by Doren Sorell)

Directed with just the right balance of the sacred and the profane by Joe Mantegna, Ronnie Marmo’s show, “I’m Not a Comedian ... I’m Lenny Bruce,” is a seamless weave of excerpts from Bruce’s acts along with original material that deftly takes us inside the man’s psyche.

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Taste of Lincoln Avenue (Special Events Management)

Gear up for nature walks, art shows and holiday markets of all sizes across Chicago and the suburbs. 

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An Apsáalooke war bonnet with a long tail, indicating that it was worn by only chiefs or accomplished warriors. (John Weinstein / Field Museum)

The first-of-its-kind exhibit in 2020 will explore the history and culture of the Apsáalooke people, an indigenous group known for its horsemanship, artistic pursuits and matriarchal ways of life.

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Chicago artist Hebru Brantley speaks with “Chicago Tonight.” (WTTW News)

Chicago artist Hebru Brantley has created works for some of Hollywood’s biggest names, and now he’s bringing some of that work home. We explore his new exhibit, Nevermore Park.

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“Check, Please!” host Alpana Singh speaks with “Chicago Tonight.” (WTTW News)

“Check, Please!” host, restaurateur and master sommelier Alpana Singh dishes on the new season of the Emmy award-winning show, which debuts Friday on WTTW.

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Is there a spark of life yet in the Bears? Former Bears offensive lineman James “Big Cat” Williams previews the team’s matchup with the Chargers on Sunday. 

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Photos of work by Chicago artist George Klauba. (Marc Vitali / WTTW News)

George Klauba is back on the scene, but he no longer inks people. These days, he’s an acclaimed painter sought after by collectors locally and abroad. And his new series of paintings features tattoo art.

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Josué Maychi (from left), Lupe de la Cruz, and Alexis Orozco (who was unable to join the Chicago production and has been replaced by Domingo Mijangos) perform in “Andares.” (Photo by Raúl Kigra)

The show’s three exceptionally graceful, expressive actors – each of them powerful solo players – form a seamless bond that is beautiful to behold. They are at once passionate artists and fierce cultural warriors.

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