|
Lynda Barry and Emmanuel Pratt (Credit: John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

An urban designer from Chicago and one of the city’s longtime illustrators are among the 2019 MacArthur fellows and recipients of the prestigious “genius grant.” 

|
Chicago Shakespeare Theater presents Isango Ensemble’s “A Man of Good Hope,” based on the book by Jonny Steinberg and adapted and directed by Mark Dornford-May, in the Courtyard Theater, Oct. 4–13, 2019. (Photo by Keith Pattinson)

Based on the book by Jonny Steinberg, “A Good Man of Hope,” is a heart-wrenching, fiercely honest, staggeringly beautiful production by South Africa’s extraordinary Isango Ensemble now on stage at Chicago Shakespeare Theater.

|
Oakland Raiders running back Josh Jacobs (28) goes in for a touchdown during the second half of an NFL football game against the Chicago Bears at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, Sunday, Oct. 6, 2019, in London. (AP Photo / Tim Ireland)

All that pregame talk about Khalil Mack and the Monsters of the Midway defense only served as motivation for the Oakland Raiders.

|

At the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian, more than 80 pieces of Native American jewelry reveal cultural history and spiritual beliefs. How this wearable art helps preserve indigenous stories.

|
(Courtesy of Damon Williams)

Damon Williams has worked at City Hall, Subway and – for the last 27 years – has been a very busy stand-up comic. We catch up with Williams ahead of his benefit for Teamwork Englewood on Friday.

|

On the South Side of Chicago is a relatively small but academically renowned museum whose founder James Henry Breasted helped rewrite the history of human civilization. We go for a look.

|

The Chicago Bears head across the pond for their matchup with the Oakland Raiders. Former Bears offensive lineman James “Big Cat” Williams has a preview.

|
(Couleur / Pixabay)

Fall flavors, a community art project, pumpkin patches and a scary film series usher in the weekend. Here are 10 things to do in and around Chicago.

|
South lion at the Art Institute of Chicago. (Heather Paul / Flickr)

From the Picasso to the Bean to countless city murals, public art is a vibrant part of Chicago culture. But for over a century, Chicagoans have taken special pride in a pair of sculptures watching over Michigan Avenue. Geoffrey Baer explains.

|
Unpublished work © 2017 The Estate of Vivian Maier. All rights reserved.

The legend of street photographer Vivian Maier has grown immeasurably since her death. Now the collector who acquired the majority of her work has made a gift to the University of Chicago: 2,700 of her images and some artifacts.

|
From left: Scott Parkinson, Stef Tovar, David Parkes, Jed Feder and Bri Sudia in TimeLine Theatre Company’s “Oslo.” (Photo by Brett Beiner Photography)

J.T. Rogers’ superbly crafted, whip-smart, at times fancifully (and farcically) imagined 2017 Tony Award-winning play captures the efforts of a Norwegian husband-and-wife team to forge a peace process between the Israeli government and the PLO.

|

Nearly two dozen Chicago Public Schools have received free art collections since the beginning of the school year. How a local nonprofit is able to provide these collections with the help of its “art subscription” concept. 

|
Ghetto residents happily strolling, 1940-1944. (Courtesy of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Gift of the Archive of Modern Conflict)

The recovered photographs of Henryk Ross reveal complex stories of life in the Lodz ghetto. We visit a new exhibit at the Illinois Holocaust Museum in Skokie.

|
Rebecca Spence in “Every Brilliant Thing.” (Photo credit: Michael Brosilow)

Ingeniously conceived and cleverly directed, this immersive show features a not-to-be-missed solo turn by Rebecca Spence, a captivating actress of extraordinary skill, charm and improvisational brilliance.

|
This July 4, 2010 file photo shows American opera singer Jessye Norman performing on the Stravinski Hall stage at the 44th Montreux Jazz Festival, in Montreux, Switzerland. (AP Photo / Keystone / Dominic Favre, File)

Jessye Norman, the renowned international opera star whose passionate soprano voice won her four Grammy Awards, the National Medal of Arts and the Kennedy Center Honor, has died, according to family spokesperson Gwendolyn Quinn. She was 74.

|
Dale Wickum (Credit: Dale Wickum / followingthetracks.com)

More than 40 years ago, Chicagoan Dale Wickum traveled all over the country by freight train to meet and photograph men who called themselves “railroad tramps.” The photos have been in storage since the 1970s. Until now.

randomness