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Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke, right, and his attorney Daniel Herbert stand before the judge’s bench Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. (Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune / Pool)

Jurors on Thursday learned how officers, including suspended Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke, are trained in the use of firearms as the second week of the high-profile murder trial came to a close.

(Credit: Sebastián Hidalgo)

Meet a photographer who captures a “culture under threat” in an area recently named by Forbes magazine as one of the 12 coolest neighborhoods in the world. 

Today, Derek Black is a graduate student at the University of Chicago. (Courtesy of Penguin Random House)

The son of a prominent white supremacist becomes a leader in his father’s movement – and then rejects the cause. A new book tells the story.

This weekend, the largest digital art projection in the world will be projected onto a Chicago landmark. Here’s a preview of Art on the Mart.

(Chicago Tonight file photo)

A new federal grant aims to help educators use the Chicago River as a “living classroom” to teach students about water quality issues. 

Northeastern Illinois University has a new president, its first African-American woman. Gloria Gibson shares her plans for the Northwest Side campus.

Watch the Sept. 27, 2018 full episode of “Chicago Tonight.”

Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh are sworn in Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

It was a long day for the Senate Judiciary Committee, and an even longer one for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and one of the women accusing him of sexual misconduct, Christine Blasey Ford.

“My family and my name have been totally and permanently destroyed by vicious and false additional accusations,” Judge Brett Kavanaugh said during a hearing on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018.

Local reaction to emotional testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee from Judge Brett Kavanaugh and his accuser Christine Blasey Ford.

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